bass in n.z.

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    Posted: 27 Nov 2005 at 3:40pm
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is there any bass in n.z if not y?
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No, It's kind of surprising that bass weren't introduced when noone thought twice about these things and various species of trout were being released all over the show. I'm sure small-mouth bass would do very well in NZ. But basically so much damage has been done to the environment and to native species by introduced species that any effort now to introduce any kind of fish or other animal into the wild won't get past stage 1.
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No there are no Bass. Why because this country has the world's best quality trout fishing and has had for over a hundred years. Why would we put all of that at risk, not neglecting the huge tourist revenue it generates for the country as well as recreational pursuits for our citizens to have Bass?

I understand it would be cool to have some of those warm water species here, especially in the far North where trout don't do as well, but the risk simply isn't worth it.

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There were moves (I think in the eighties) to introduce Bass to this country but they were unsuccessful for the reasons outlined above.
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Im in favour of introducing bass.

I would like to see them introduced into the hydro lakes and upper nth island lakes.

1/ They would eat the perch, koi, rudd etc that are threatening our clean waterways. The positives to this is we would prevent the problems we are expecting to see as carp become more widespread. Bass do not muddy up the waterways as trout do.
2/ Take Lake Otatoa for example - a world class trout fishery ruined by perch. Put Bass in their and they would eat the perch. This would create - 3.
3/ World class Bass fishery near Auckland. First Otatoa then our next opportunity is bass in lake Pupuke. There is currently a wide variety of fish in Pupuke, introducing bass would not adversly effect the quality of the fishery of this lake. The positive results would be stagering - creating sales for local retailers, manufacturers and wholesalers for a new sports fish, new fishing magazines and fishing show opportunities. The employment opportunities are huge.
4/ Trout fishing has a minority following throughout most parts of the world. Similar to snapper vs trout in NZ. The financial benefits from snapper fishing significantly outway that of trout. The same would be true if we created a bass fishery in NZ. We would see more overseas anglers spending more money than they do currently for trout fishing.
5/ The effects on trout fishing rivers. Minimal if at all measurable. Bass will not survive in our back country rivers. So there is no risk of putting our world class fiheries at risk. The majority of overseas anglers come to fish these back country rivers. Therefore we would not effect the numbers of overseas anglers coming to fish these rivers.
6/ The big lakes of the Nth and Sth island. Well to put it plunty most of the Rotorua lakes are buggered already. Bass would have a far greater survival rate in Rotorua and rotoiti than trout in 20 yrs from now. We already run the risk of not having a fishery in these lakes in the future. At least by introducing bass we would all have something fun to fish for.
7/ Many of the Sth Island alpine lakes are to cold to support the survival of Bass. Therefore there is limited risk of bass surviving in these lakes if introduced.

8/ The real biggy is Lake Taupo. The lake is so huge that trout would be able to out run the bass. Potentially you could have a unique trout fishery and bass fishery. This happens in much of california. The negative is bass could be the main catch. Who had a great season on the Tongariro this year anyhow. Not many if any.

9/ Great lakes we could lose as trout fisheries - Taupo and Tarawera. Koi could ruin these any how.

10/ Ever been to a waikato hydro lake in summer. Its not easy to catch a trout when these lakes warm and algae becomes a problem. Bass would feeding furociously - wow what a bonus.

11/ Competitions with huge money - A mate of mine earns US$100000.00 a year on the USA bass pro curit. Imagine comps like that here. Most of us would give up our day jobs.

12/ We are facing droughts, water shortages etc in the future. Already we are seeing the effects of global warming on the spawning runs of the tongariro. Bass would thrive in Taupo. Ecpect to have 50fish + days - WOW.

Bass are a great fish. We would have been better off with these guys than the perch, rudd, koi and catfish in our waterways. If we didnt have Taupo and Rotorua then we would all be looking at Bass as the saviour to our fishing and recreation.

Mind you I wouldnt mind Tiger Fish and Baramundi.

My ideal world would be trout in the back country rivers, bass and trout in Taupo and Bass, Tigers and Baramundi in the hydro lakes and upper nth island lakes.

The Fact - The world is not ideal. Our waterways and fihery is sliding down hill. Please protect what we have - Didomo is going to ruin our fishing well before DOC finds a solution. If you dont like what I have written
(and I know many of you would not have) then get in contact with your local MP and see what is being done to protect your waterway and fishery from Didomo. DOC and many of those who make a living from the NZ trout fishery do not want other introduced fish species. But what is happening with Didomo and when will we start to see some action.

I know the ITM Fishing Show does not have a political agenda but it is a great platform to increase the awareness of the didimo problem. DOC only spends 75% of its annual budget on fisheries research. DOC has huge amounts of money available to them to find a solution as soon as possible. What are we waiting for. What are shows like the ITM FS,Geoff Thomas, gone fishing doing to protect the values Cicada, myself and many others enjoy.

Any how its late - you all get the idea of the message. I am surprised the pressure has not come on DOC as yet. DOC sat on the paited apple moth thing for years until public pressure brought action.

Lets hear your say now!























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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Blue Asparagus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Nov 2005 at 9:51pm
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as much as i don't get into mud fishing although i have done a lot of it, I would hate to see another introduced fish into our fresh water, you only have to look at the Koi Carp etc to see what sor tof pest they are. What would the Bass eat? no doubt small fry etc and our trout/salmon have a hell of a time as it is. No I vote not to have them, but I am never right afterall i got married and am told on a regular basis.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Whitey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2005 at 4:52am
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The fact of the matter is, trout and bass do not coexist very well.  Bass, by nature are invasive and will eventually overtake any trout species in any water body to the point of extinction.  And they will be spread to other water bodies without intention. We have already made these mistakes in the US.  Please, for the love of god don't do it.  People go to New Zealand to trout fish because its one of the last places left where the trout fisheries have not been destroyed by foolish fishery management.  I believe you will beat didymo if NZ DOC treats it like the plague, cross contamination must be kept to ZERO!  Areas with Didymo must be closed to fishing. Meanwhile you must experiment with different solutions, some of which may temporarily affect local trout and insect populations (ie, algaecides, drought, physical excavation & removal, etc.)  However, once local infestations are remedied, the trout populations can be carefully restored.  The hardest part of this is money.  Beating didymo will cost a lot of $$$, NZ DOC must find the money.  Pilot studies and pilot remedies must be tried and tested starting this year.  My company, Cummins Envirotech, Inc., specializes (in part) in the design and implementation of in situ remedies for management of algal blooms, invasive flora, etc.  The first step is to collect water quality data (ie. pH, Temp, DO, ORP, EC, NH3, PO4, NO3, etc.) for a full annual period.  It's quite simple really, once you find out what it likes and needs, you change the local environment so its not so happy, and then death.  Containment and removal are often the most effective measures, however, also the most expensive.

See you soon.

Whitey

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote bushkid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2005 at 6:34am
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ohh this sound like a good thread.
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Herring, are you just trying to wind us up?

Smallmoth bass are an incredibly hardy species. They are found in just about every state in the USA, and in Canada. They love warm water (27C is fine) but they tolerate the cold water lakes in Canada. They eat anything that they can fit into their mouths but like fish and crayfish most. I have had some fantastic fishing for them in South Africa - they take flies readily and fight well.

They have filled a vacancy in the fishing waters in SA, in that most ofthe rivers are too warm for trout except in the headwaters. This is not the case in NZ - only in the far north can trout not survive in lowland rivers.

But......... SM and LM bass have been responsible for pushing native species to the verge of extinction in SA and Japan. They crowd out trout in many SA streams. They would probably adapt to most NZ waters very well. The SM bass fishery would be good, but not world class. You're dreaming if you think that tourists would come to NZ to catch bass.

NZ has fantastic trout fishing. I personally would strongly oppose anything that has even a remote possibility of threatening the trout fishery. It always amazes me how people are never satisfied with what they have - even when what they have is bloody brilliant!

 

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Kerren Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2005 at 3:03pm
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Intersting convo and enjoying the moot points being broadcast...If populations of bass could be contained then I for one would enjoy spedning more money of a different angling pursuit - but not at the risk of what we have already!

Herring makes a point of suggesting that we introduce a species to control another species?....yeah cause that has worked in the past hasn't it? and I can't let this one go...

Herring please choose your words more carefully as I don't want to suffer the embarrasment of explaing to my child what the man meant when he said "the Rotorua lakes are buggered (meaning sodomised?) already"....not really the correct use of english in a public forum...tsk tsk!

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote bushkid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2005 at 5:22pm
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Well I reckon if the world was Ideal we should introduce bass into the lakes and rivers up north. most, with some exceptions, would be ideal fisheries. imagine spending a day fishing off the rocks at spirits bay then having a bass fishing session in the lagoon by the camp. fantastic. look at lake omapere it's naffed and fool of grass carp, why not chuck some bass in there. yes they would spread if not naturally then by some plonker as has happened to lake opotoa with perch. with out really understanding their biology it's hard to say if they could breed when moved further south. so maybe it's not a real risk, many fish can survive low temps but cannot spawn or reproduce ie spotted black gropper and many of the wrasse spp. found around our coastline.

OK say didymo and koi take out the great lake of taupo and ruin the lake fishery, and this could very very easily happen, why not chuck bass or similar in. as for rotorua that is a yucky and at times smelly pond but an amazing fishery, still if koi etc stuff it why throw bass in there too?.

it has not worked in nz's favour to introduce an animal to control another animal thats for sure but if the fishery is stuffed why not make use of it?

 anyway I'm of to catch some trout to put in my mates dam!

 i think Herring has some good points, certainly  ponder a few of them but the chances of getting any new fish species into the country is very low esp how doc and forest n bird would like to eradicate trout from our rivers anyway let alone introduce another predator of native fish.

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Hi upstream - Yeah trying to wind you up to a point. As I would like to see more awareness on the effects of Didimo, as this could destroy the fishing we enjoy at present. Forget the birdfly this is far more serious.

I am in favour of bass coming into NZ, there are alot of positives. When would I like to see this - well the ideal time may be if our rivers are destroyed by this nasty little invader (didimo and Koi and Perch.

DOC would love to get rid of all introduced animals - Thar are a classic. Some sandel wearers would even like to get rid of trout. But what are they doing to remove Didimo? DOC are spending more effort, time and money on Thar radication and 1080 for possums.

At this stage DOC have moved slowly and over cautiously in removing didimo. We could lose what we currently value and my above post outlines a favourable alternative if we lose our trout fishery.

If you like the alternative then great this could be our future. If you dont like it then the wheels need to start turning. Its a long process to have your voice heard.

Kerren - If we lose the water quality we currently have and our great trout fishery to Koi, Perch and rock snot then introducing a better (Bass) option may not be a bad idea.











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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Capt Asparagus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2005 at 5:48pm
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I too would like to see bass introduced to NZ waters. Trout are fine, no worries, but not exactly holy creatures. I think as an introduced rec fishing species, in the lower waikato river hydro lakes and the northland lakes they would be a superb addition to our sport.

Cheers,

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote bushkid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2005 at 7:54pm
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I think this is approching the first intelligent thread I have read on this forum.. that is to say I haven't managed to dumb it down yet.

Herring, could you keep your sentences shorter please, I get confused half way through them.

 there we go I've dumbed it down... ahh happy now.

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote karm Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Nov 2005 at 10:15pm
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Herring an interesting thought

I think I would be very afraid that bass would destroy too much trout fishery
but I'm glad that we are talking about invasive species and threats to our fisheries
I'm a little surprised that we have not angsted over didymo
you may like to check out the site provided by Waikatowanderer "an excelent place for solid info is
http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests-diseases/plants/didymo/.."

Nothing I have read about didymo gives me hope that we will eradicate it
Are any of the forum members on the executive of either North shore fly fishers or AFAC,
Didymo really is a major threat to our trout fishery .. we all need to whine and gripe about this to DOC our MPs etc to ensure everzthing is done to contain or eradicate it.

Whitey .. great words and ideas ... perhaps while you are visiting you had better put your CV around a few places and market yourself as expert from the US of A coming to eradicate didymo ???
You would get an NZ Green Card equivalent ' and you sound a reasonable bloke


And while we are on this invasive'conservation protect our god given fishing heaven thread
think of this
I was in Canada when the cod fishery was finally destroyed ..
After years of overfishing
It was a commercial fishery .. based on a culture of evading fishery regulations and enforcement
the bigger the catch the bigger the man, the bigger his willy ...
Cod I think live for 40, 60, 70 years a long time anyway,and donćt reproduce for until they are quite old (experts please advise )

Now I admit at times due to my fishing I have enjoyed big willy status on occasion ...
but if a 4kg snapper is 20 years old , and we have 1million recreational fishers in NZ, and we love to target them snaps spawning on the worm beds, if we were all to catch and keep 10 snaps and 2 kings this summer
just how long do you think our fishery will last ...

Having said that I hope to post a picture of my first legal kingi on here soon.... )kept and eaten)

but I do worry about about our resource ...
and that perhaps we take it for granted.

Sorry about the sermon.


Karm


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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Whitey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Nov 2005 at 2:27am
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Ok folks, if you want Bass to run roughshod across NZ than you certainly have the right to it.  Just remember, the problem isn't so much the fish, it's the people who love fishing for the fish, they are the ones that will secretly seed other lakes and rivers for recreational preference and run the trout into history.  I recommend that you study other areas of the globe that have tried this first so that you know the REAL consequences before you try it.

As for Didymo, lets select a river, close it and begin testing.  Must start collecting information and trying management practices ASAP before it becomes unmanageable.  At the same time we must harvest some Didymo, grow it in the Lab, and run some tests on it there as well. 

Whitey

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Pole Dancer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Nov 2005 at 7:30am
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Good call Whitey. You are 100% correct in what you say about Bass.

I understand Herring's point of view and share the thought that fishing for Bass would be great. However there are major flaws in his argument and the major one is the seeding you outline.

That is how the majority of our "trash fish" have already been introduced. Also there has never been a case of fish containment in NZ yet. If a particular fish is introduced to a specific waterway it has, in every case turned up in other waterways. Some of these fish spread themselves in unique ways. Perch, for instance, can have their eggs transported into ponds on the feet of waterfowl.

 

Introducing Bass to NZ would court disaster because as Whitey has pointed out they will out compete the trout. The size of lakes will be no sanctuary for fish as it has not been in the equally huge impoundments in the US. If only planted in northland where they would thrive they would soon be spread by anglers who wanted to fish for them elsewhere. There is also a major chance of disease introduction with new fish stocks something we are relatively free of in NZ at present.

Tournaments would not reach the scale here they do in the US and would have no chance of emulating those in the US the same way the NZ Golf Open can't compete with the US Golf Open, or our Tennis Tournaments can't compete. We do not have the population to create the multi billion dollar industry here they have in the US. That's a pipedream. We currently have a sports fishery that generates hundreds of millions of dollars for the NZ economy at almost no cost to the taxpayer and we would jeopardise that for a 100-1 shot bass tournament? I don't think so.

After 200 years of introducing species to this country we should by now know that the vast majority have, while introduced to be of value, become pests which need constant population control at a cost to the taxpayer and at the expense of other wanted species. Stoats and ferrets were introduced to kill rabbits which were introduced and have been a plague; the counter introduction was of no use and has decimated our native birds etc... Introducing bass would be another step down that road. Trout don't muddy waterways... carp do, but to introduce Bass to fix a problem created by Carp being introduced would be akin to introducing Ferrets to kill rabbits... it won't work and will create other problems.

It amazes me the northern fisheries that have been screwed over by poorly thought fish introductions, in many cases by coarse anglers wanting to emulate sports from other countries or their home countries, as outlined Lake Pupuke and others. When I was a kid there was a good brook trout fishery there, right in Auckland... it would be fantastic if there was a way to put Bass in there, have them go nowhere else and for the kids of Auckland, and adults to experience but there is no practical way to do it without causing even more harm to our already pressured freshwater fisheries. Both fish and game and the NZFFA have huge libraries of documentation and research on other species and their potential impacts these should not be idle thoughts wondering what could be because the information is there of what would be if some species were introduced and it is frightening!!! Its a non argument as the scientific information is such that the idea of introducing Bass to NZ will never get beyond this forum as the dangers are known, documented and scientific it would be an ecological disaster for this country and not just with trout!

Didymo stands to have a major impact. It will not wipe out our trout fisheries. It will impact a number of rivers but probably wont bloom in the majority of our rivers. The measures in place in NZ will slow its spread but they will not and cannot stop it. Biosecurity were absolutely abysmal in their response and probably the spread has not been contained as it could have been in the early stages as their concerns were not great enough. primarily they are concerned with stopping stuff getting here, once its here it's a failure on their part and containment seemed fruitless to them even though Fish and Game were screaming for measures to be put in place as was the New Zealand Professional Fishing Guides Association back in June. As a guide I have invested in large containers and detergents etc to clean all visiting anglers equipment, waders and boots when they arrive and before they depart in accordance with the guidelines set out by F&G and NZPFGA, we have a responsibility to slow this thing, but we will not stop it no matter how diligent and cautious we are, we can slow it down though.

My biggest fear with Didymo is that the only way to eradicate it is to basically wipe out all of the life in a river. This may seem a solution... wipe it out now where its been found and let the rivers embark on a 3-8 year course of re-establishing itself... but beware there are nutters out there in DOC land and Forest and Bird that would have every non indigenous creature banished from this land including us and there will be major opposition to reintroducing trout into these waterways if that "cure" is enacted. This may seem "out there" but these nutters have clout and already have made impractical ideas a reality in many cases.

Didymo is here to stay I'm afraid and it will have major impact on many waterways, but not all and most likely not the vast majority, but it will impact.

 

Introducing further species as some counter mechanism is just plain folly. We have to nurture and care take what we have not recklessly create more problems. While I would love nothing better than having a local spot where I could go and throw fly rod poppers at Large Mouth bass I shudder at the thought of the reality.

 

 

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The best thing about this debate is that it is purely academic. There is no way that MAF or DOC would contemplate such a thing. I see that people couldn't even get flowers in for the Ellerslie show.

Saying that, I do love fishing for SM bass. I once caught a 40cm bass with a 15cm bluegill sunfish in its stomach. These boys are always hungry! I also once watched a snake swimming across a river with a bass in hot pursuit, nipping at the snake and almost drowning it until it finally made its escape up the bank.

Fishing for them with poppers is very exciting. The fish errupts out of the water and absolutely smashes the popper. The fish will then almost always jump and will fight to the bank. LM bass are poor fighters. If you hold them on the first jump and prevent them wrapping you around some structure, they will just flop all the way to the boat.

But I would never risk the superb trout fishing we have here for the sake of a few bass.

 

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Whitey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Nov 2005 at 2:46am
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Hello Folks,

Wanted to share this article about the Rapid river in Maine, USA in regards to a smallmouth bass nightmare going on there as we speak.  Brook Trout are native to the US and are being eliminated by the smallmouth bass.  This River used to be one of the best in the USA for trophy brookies.  Now, a one pounder is a real catch! Some interesting info here and its not all bad.  I guess the salmon populations can compete with the smallies, but not the trout.

      The Rapid River is 3.2 miles long and forms the outlet of the Rangeley Chain of Lakes, which have long been noted for their outstanding brook trout and landlocked salmon fisheries. The Rapid River is famed for its large (>4 pound) native brook trout, and for small but abundant landlocked salmon, which were introduced late in the 19th century. The Rapid River supports very high fishing pressure, despite difficult access. 

      Pond in the River, 512 acres in size, divides the Rapid River into two distinct segments. Pond in the River provides important habitat for certain life stages of Rapid River trout. Both waters drain to 7,850-acre Umbagog Lake, which then forms the Androscoggin River in New Hampshire. A USFW National Wildlife Refuge encompasses a portion of Umbagog Lake. 

      The upper Androscoggin River drainage provides water storage and minimum flows to many downstream industrial and municipal interests. There are several large dams on the Rangeley Lakes, all currently owned and operated by FPL Energy. 

      The Rapid River fishery supports two sporting camps: Lakewood Camps, located on Richardson Lake, and Forest Lodge, located near Lower Dam. The latter is situated in the former home of Louise Dickinson Rich, a Maine author who wrote several popular books about her life on the Rapid River. 


The Problem

      Smallmouth bass were illegally introduced into the New Hampshire portion of Umbagog Lake, probably during the mid-1980s. They quickly established themselves there, and by the late 1990s had expanded their range to other accessible waters in the drainage, including the Rapid River and Pond in the River. Both waters provide ideal habitat for smallmouth bass and, as expected, we have observed a dramatic increase in their numbers. 

      Smallmouth bass are severe competitors and predators on brook trout. Wild brook trout production is expected to decline during the next several years. Landlocked salmon are far more tolerant of bass, and we expect this naturalized population to persist. 

      Bass are prevented from accessing (on their own) other large lakes in the Rangeley Chain because the dams are impassable to fish. However, we anticipate additional illegal stockings to occur from this new local reservoir of bass. 


Department Actions Taken to Date  

      Intensive sport fishery surveys of the Rapid River have been ongoing since 1994. 

      Habitat surveys of the Rapid River and Pond in the River, including preliminary suitability studies for smallmouth bass, have been completed. 

      Growth and age structure characteristics have been described for all major predator fishes, including smallmouth bass (ongoing). 

      A no size or bag limit rule for bass was promulgated in 2000. 

      An existing barrier dam at B Pond in Upton (tributary to Umbagog Lake) was repaired in 2001. 

      Radio telemetry studies to determine seasonal movements and habitat use of adult brook trout were initiated in 2002. A similar study of landlocked salmon and smallmouth bass movements was initiated in 2003 (ongoing). 

      A preliminary assessment of juvenile brook trout and landlocked salmon habitat use, and their interactions with young bass in nursery areas, was initiated in 2003 (ongoing). 

      A comprehensive regulatory package was promulgated for the 2004 fishing season. The regulations are designed to provide maximum protection to trout during vulnerable periods (as determined by telemetry studies) and to reduce competition from landlocked salmon. 

      Surveys of existing natural bass barriers and the feasibility of establishing additional barriers to vulnerable trout waters were initiated in 2003. We are currently emphasizing protection of Umbagog Lake and Richardson Lake tributary ponds, but we anticipate extending this project to other waters further upstream (ongoing). 

      Genetic studies of the Rapid River brook trout population have been initiated and opportunities for establishing a broodline of this strain are being explored (ongoing). 

      A food habits study was initiated for all life stages of smallmouth bass collected from the Rapid River, Pond in the River, and Umbagog Lake (ongoing). 

      A comprehensive review of the professional fisheries literature pertinent to this problem was initiated, and personal contacts were established with university researchers specializing in smallmouth bass and brook trout interactions (ongoing). 

      A significant effort has been made to elicit support and assistance from a variety of local and statewide angler groups, including local sporting camp operators and anglers, the Rangeley Guides and Sportsmans Association, and Trout Unlimited (ongoing). 


Immediate Work Priorities (see footnotes for volunteer assistance)

        Aggressively seek funding and initiate bass barrier project for upstream watersSUP1/SUP/SPAN.  

      Complete ongoing telemetry, genetics, and bass food habits studiesSUP2/SUP/SPAN.  

      Establish a broodline of the Rapid River trout strain if warranted by genetics studySUP3/SUP/SPAN. This may require additional hatchery resources, and we may need to locate and reclaim a suitable site to hold brood fish in the wildSUP4/SUP/SPAN -- if natural reproduction fails due to bass predation and competition, replacing lost juvenile production with Rapid River-strain hatchery fish may be the most effective, realistic means of mitigating the presence of bass.  

      Seek funding and support to expand juvenile trout habitat surveys and evaluate the efficacy of controlling bass in these critical areas. The Department recommends that this work be contracted to a university graduate student or consulting firm.  

      Collaborate with FPL Energy and Settlement Team to reassess the Rapid Rivers flow regime. Studies should be initiated to determine flow regimes most favorable to trout life stages and least favorable to smallmouth bass and landlocked salmon.      

      Continue reviews of the scientific literature pertinent to this issue, and maintain contacts with other professionals involved in this work. The Department is currently seeking assistance from an independent contractor to facilitate a detailed review of the literature. This contract will include provisions for submitting summary reports for professional workers as well as for the general public.  

      Continue sport fishery surveys and maintain current biological information for Rapid River salmonidsSUP5/SUP/SPAN. Design study plan to effectively monitor effects of new fishing regulations and possible flow regime changes.  

 

Now think, do you really want to go here!

Regards,

Whitey


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The New Zealand equivalent to Large/smallmouth bass is Trout because it is the most sought-after freshwater game fish(a fun fact you didn't know about)
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