FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Advice for those starting out

Page  123 126>
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote long john Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Advice for those starting out
    Posted: 01 Feb 2009 at 6:15pm
long john View Drop Down
Moderator - Brown Belt
Moderator - Brown Belt
Avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2002
Status: Offline
Points: 7377
The purpose of this 'sticky' topic is to provide answers to those questions frequently asked by divers starting out. In the past we've had some questions asked so many times that when the new lurker finally gets brave enough to post there questions, there is a general indifference from other forum members and subsequently a low rate of reply. Not only is that unhelpful but it can look a little snobby too and is hardly encouraging.
So, hopefully this time around, as questions get asked, we can all provide our knowledge and opinions on the best length gun, type of wetsuit etc in the knowledge that we can put that topic to bed forever and at the same time contribute to what may in time become a valuable resource for people wanting to get into the awesome lifestyle that is spearfishing.
There are some amazingly skilled and knowledgable spearfishers and freedivers who frequent this forum so this is a perfect opportunity to get the good oil from those in the know. So c'mon all you lurkers and new guys, fire away!!!!!!! Clap
Proud member of the Glen Innes Spearfishing Club
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote jaydogfish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Feb 2009 at 6:33pm
jaydogfish View Drop Down
Gold
Gold
Avatar

Joined: 14 Nov 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 599
ill start!!!!!!
does anyone use a spear with two floppers on it? have had a few big fish lost and some with holes so big it ruins the fillet. i know the best result would be to shot the fish "properly"  but most of the time that doesnt happen for me. someone also told me that if the flopper is further back this will help. is this true?
THE DOGG
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote long john Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Feb 2009 at 9:21pm
long john View Drop Down
Moderator - Brown Belt
Moderator - Brown Belt
Avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2002
Status: Offline
Points: 7377
I don't think too many guys in N.Z run two floppers. What kind of gun you got? A lot of euro guns have tiny little floppers that tend to pull out easily whereas the saffa shafts (and increasingly now the euro ones) have a flopper about 80mm long, which rarely pull as long as the shaft has gone right through.
Proud member of the Glen Innes Spearfishing Club
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote pure--lure Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 9:18am
pure--lure View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium
Avatar

Joined: 20 Jan 2009
Location: Hibiscus Coast
Status: Offline
Points: 3707

Hey guys just got gun and stuff never shot a fish etc and am building confidence up in swimming where would be a good spot to start someone said ti point

Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote mario Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 10:27am
mario View Drop Down
Silver
Silver


Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Status: Offline
Points: 203
Well, at the moment Tee point is getting a real floggin! Terefore it is esy to shoot a snapper say at Takatu point, tan a Butter at Tee point! 
 The place runs hot and cold ,but lately has been an iceberg!!Cry I will suggest to you to try places as Pakery, Teari point, or the Coramandel (Hot water beech, for ex.)
And let Tee point have a bit of a rest.Star
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote hunt&gather Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 11:55am
hunt&gather View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 27 Nov 2008
Location: Wellies
Status: Offline
Points: 1610
What is the optimum weight/buoyancy for diving (obviously this depends on size/wetsuit thickness etc) - but should you have positive buoyancy in the top water column? I can dive 10/12m comfortably and have enough weight to be neutral at the surface then obviously sink during decent and sit on the bottom. Should you decrease weight as your ability to dive deeper improves? Confused
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 12:19pm
TG View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 2622
Thought this might fit in here.

Anyone know of any public/Gym pools in the north shore and how much they are to join. Just for training would be brilliant.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Azazel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 1:01pm
Azazel View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Location: Wellington
Status: Offline
Points: 1388
Originally posted by hunt&gather hunt&gather wrote:

What is the optimum weight/buoyancy for diving (obviously this depends on size/wetsuit thickness etc) - but should you have positive buoyancy in the top water column? I can dive 10/12m comfortably and have enough weight to be neutral at the surface then obviously sink during decent and sit on the bottom. Should you decrease weight as your ability to dive deeper improves? Confused

You should be bouyant at half your intended depth at the very least. As you get deeper, weight should be taken off to maintain that.

For reference, I try to be neutral at ~7-8m if I'm diving to 10 or so and aim for ~12m if I'm diving to 18-20.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TheSnapperWhisperer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 1:17pm
TheSnapperWhisperer View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium
Avatar

Joined: 09 Oct 2002
Status: Offline
Points: 6818
TG, please don't train in a pool until you've done a proper freediving course and have someone in the water with you who has first hand knowledge of how to recover a blacked out diver.  Every year a few people worldwide die 'training' for freediving in public pools alone while lifegurds watch on and people swim over them. 
 
Public pools are a pain because most are full much of the time, making sharing a lane a hassle.  If you want to train, do it with a group from No Bubbles.
http://www.facebook.com/TheSnapperWhisperer
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote hunt&gather Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 1:41pm
hunt&gather View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 27 Nov 2008
Location: Wellies
Status: Offline
Points: 1610
Originally posted by Azazel Azazel wrote:

Originally posted by hunt&gather hunt&gather wrote:

What is the optimum weight/buoyancy for diving (obviously this depends on size/wetsuit thickness etc) - but should you have positive buoyancy in the top water column? I can dive 10/12m comfortably and have enough weight to be neutral at the surface then obviously sink during decent and sit on the bottom. Should you decrease weight as your ability to dive deeper improves? Confused

You should be bouyant at half your intended depth at the very least. As you get deeper, weight should be taken off to maintain that.

For reference, I try to be neutral at ~7-8m if I'm diving to 10 or so and aim for ~12m if I'm diving to 18-20.
 
Thanks Azazel - had a feeling I may have been carrying a bit much weight as having to push off the bottom - can be a bit sapping towards the end of my breath
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 1:45pm
TG View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 2622
Hi Snapper,

I got you there but I was actually just referring to doing the old freestyle lenghts and actually breathing. hehe. I am very unfit and I actually have my provinsial colours in swimming (Many years qago).

I think swimming (normal swimming the old fashioned way) is a brilliant method of exercise as it gives good cardio and a bit of movement of the muscles without putting much strain on your body (i.e. knees and running)

Later!
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 1:45pm
TG View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 2622
PS: I am planning a course with no bubbles, but I would like to go there very fit, otherwise I'll feel like I'm wasting my time.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 2:44pm
TG View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 2622
Quick one.

Shooting line for Rob Allen gun or any gun for that matter. How long and what breaking strain?
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Azazel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 3:21pm
Azazel View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Location: Wellington
Status: Offline
Points: 1388
Originally posted by TG TG wrote:

Quick one.

Shooting line for Rob Allen gun or any gun for that matter. How long and what breaking strain?

Shooting line length is defined in 'wraps' of gun. On almost all the guns we use here, the line attaches to the muzzle, often with a bungee, then loops back to the line release by the trigger, then back up the barrel, through the muzzle and onto the back of the spear. That makes the line ~3x the length of the gun, with theoretical range as 3xbarrel length + spear as measured from the muzzle. A double wrap is 5x barrel length.

As for breaking strain, the usual range is 250-400 pound mono. 300 should be plenty. Dyneema/Spectra can also be used, if you like.

On the other note about fitness, cardio fitness is nice, especially for repetitive diving, but it's actually not an advantage for breath-holds. In other words, lose the fuel tank by all means, but don't go crazy.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Mullins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 3:47pm
Mullins View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 19 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 5971
I'm doing quite a bit of cardio at the moment and it's killing my max distances. Luckily it's a short term thing (stop the cardio, go back to apnea training and they improve again). Problem is you get really good bloodflow to your muscles (high capillary density) which is not good for oxygen conservation. It's more complicated than that and fitness does help apnea up to a point, but isn't necessary to be more than 'moderately' fit. 
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 3:59pm
TG View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 2622
Moderately sounds good Mullins. I don't wanna go overboard. In short, seeing that you are one hellava freediver, what do you see as being the best exercise, just doing it and dive as much as possible and see how far you can go under water in the pool as much as possible. (With people watching you of course)

PS: Thanks for that tip about the line Azazel, I have been wondering what "double wrap" mean for some time now but never thought of asking. Makes better sense now.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 4:01pm
TG View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 2622
Another question maybe for Mullins. If someones wants to start freediving competetively, do you reckon the ripe age of 30 is a little to late to start? I doubt I would want to do it competitively as I am more into the spearfishing part of it but it is intresting to know.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Mullins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 4:29pm
Mullins View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 19 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 5971
The best female freediver in the world is in her mid 40s....

Age has no particular drawbacks in freediving.

What's the best kind of exercise? If you want to train for spearfishing, probably lots of repetitions around 30-50% of your max, e.g. 50m dynamics with 1-2 minutes rest or something. If you want to train to freedive, you need to do fewer, longer dynamics with more rest in between. The two sports are quite different physiologically. Or rather, you'll find they're the same to start off with but as you get better you'll need to either choose one and specialise, or compromise between the two.

I can't really suggest distances, times etc because I'm not that familiar with what newish divers do. I think most find 50m dynamic "ok but a little challenging" then things get more serious around the 70m mark, so it's probably a good distance to aim for to begin with.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote TG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 4:45pm
TG View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 2622
I like that Mullins, saying it in very few words.

So with dynamics? Fins or no Fins.

In my ripe young age I was able to do 50 m dynamic with no fins. Those were the days! Still way off your 200 + m

So for spearfishing, you need to figure out what your best is, then run 30 - 50 % against that and then re-evaluate over a course again.


Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Mullins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2009 at 4:55pm
Mullins View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 19 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 5971
Fins probably better for spearfishing, because the exercise is more specific and you get strength/technique training thrown in. However most nofins specialists find it very easy to convert across to using fins, because they have the breathhold side of it so well covered. So whichever one you prefer really. Of course, for spearfishing you need to be a reasonably good surface swimmer so that might be the deal-breaker when it comes to nofins.

Yes: the difficulty is finding what your actual max is, and it helps for the number to be genuine so you'll be in for a bit of pain. Also, the percentages will probably drop as you get better so my 30%-50% figure is only approximate. E.g. many beginners can comfortably do lots of reps very close to their max, because they have no dive response and it's like a normal (aerobic) swim for them as far as muscle fatigue goes. Whereas if I do a 100% swim I can't walk for the next 10 minutes and I need to go home for a lie-down, have a cup of green tea and possibly call in sick the next day with a headache. Even a 50% swim (124m) puts me in slight oxygen debt.
Back to Top
Page  123 126>
Forum Jump
Forum Permissions View Drop Down


This page was generated in 0.201 seconds.