The Tongariro Roll Cast

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fishb8 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jul 2022 at 5:38pm
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Titanium
Titanium
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Joined: 17 Jul 2002
Location: Hamilton
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Points: 9343
I'd love to see this in action. Don't have the cash to buy new rods so have to live with current rods. (CD GHR in 4 & 8)
Just a bit flummoxed by the Imperial/metric stuff (I know you must be writing for the US market (along with Liberia & Myanmar)!!
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Rainbow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jul 2022 at 9:32pm
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Topic Moderator
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Joined: 27 Jul 2005
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Points: 3279
I also fish with CDrods but mine are the XLS and Try CD.     Here is the link to some videos I did with the Guideline shooting heads


https://vimeo.com/manage/videos/614130768

https://vimeo.com/614128552?from=outro-local

https://vimeo.com/manage/videos/614127154

Cheers 

Rainbow
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Cormorant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Nov 2022 at 11:16am
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Bronze
Bronze


Joined: 29 Jul 2020
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I transitioned to the euro technique about three years ago, building a 3 weight, 11 ft rod on a CTS blank.  My catch rate improved, and I no longer ended my stints on the Tongariro with inflamed elbow tendons.  However I found I got through an awful lot of weighted flies.  The total weight of tungsten left in the river bed every year is interesting to calculate. 

I tried a variation this year using a drop shot setup - now that lead shot is legal I assume it is legal to use a hookless weight as the bomb.  I tried it first in Hawke's Bay where regulations are more open anyway.  Someone can please let me know if it isn't legal.  

Part of my motivation was to reduce the amount of tungsten left in the riverbed.  Tungsten is a heavy metal, and while not as toxic as lead, is not without concern. For a weight, I tried two or three different versions.  Firstly I tried a short copper chain I made from heavy guage wire, welding the links to make a 1gm bomb.  The idea came from using chain as a sinker around rocks - it tends to run over rocks rather than locking up.  I also made up bombs from 4mm and 4.5mm tungsten beads, using a short, braided thread loop.  As a last resort I made up some lead shot bombs, drilling the shot with a .1mm drill and attaching a loop.  I intend to make up solid copper bombs this coming year.  Obviously eliminating lead entirely as an environmental input is the end goal.

I made up a batch of unweighted flies, from size 16 to 10.  This set-up proved quite effective (in October I hooked 32 fish in a week's fishing, despite a 200cumec flood midweek).  I found that I did lose a few bombs, but usually got my flies back.  The bomb often came free when snagged, but didn't of course prevent the flies hooking up on branches.  With the bottom fly on a 100mm dropper about 200mm above the bomb, I think I was closer to the fish than a heavy bomb fly, and far more natural.  I often used a size 14 or even 16 on the bottom, and a size 10 higher up - the reverse of what I would do with a standard set-up.  The hookless bomb was on 7lb, while the rest of the tippet was 8lb.

Anyway, the main advantages are that the flies can be small, and drift more naturally than weighted flies.  The cost of my flies was reduced (no tungsten bead and smaller), and I lost fewer of them on snags.  The appearance of my flies wasn't constrained by having beads (I used variations of a silk, glo thread or dubbed body with a throat hackle of hare's ear or CDC, applied with a dubbing loop).  

There is very little about this obvious technique on U-Tube, although I found one senior US fisherman who uses nothing else.  (Google "drop shot euro").
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fishb8 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Nov 2022 at 2:40pm
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Titanium
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Joined: 17 Jul 2002
Location: Hamilton
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I have seen several anglers this year at Taupo fishing those soft globugs with a splitshot dropper below the fly. Looking at the rules and can't see anything to say it's not legal. One guy showed me what he did. The fly was on the mainline of 8 or 9 lb then a lighter piece about 400 mm was uni-knotted above the fly. Seemed to get used on the shallower runs and very effective.

I too suffered from tennis elbow, too. Had to pack up fly fishing for months at a time. Now this seems like a snake oil promo but I bought a set of 3 rubber bars (3 thicknesses and strengths). You hold upright with grips opposed and twist to pre-load the bar then twist like a motorbike throttle - 20 times, I think a couple of times a day for 6 weeks. After 3 weeks I increased duration and numbers per day. 6 weeks later I was twisting 40 times, 4 times a day and my tennis elbow was healed. You can cure golfers elbow by reversing the technique. The muscles/tendons have never given any problems in the 6 years since I used the bars.
I have loaned the bars to several people, and all have had their elbows fixed. I have one bar left as I think the missing ones were passed on to others. No magic, just strengthening the affected bits.

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