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The meaning of "to a lesser extent"

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    Posted: 30 Sep 2019 at 12:57pm
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Dear forum members

Thank you so much for helping me many times.

I have got another question about "Serious about Trout Fishing" by
Tony Orman and John Morton.

There are two paragraphs on page 125 - 126, Chapter 18: "What’s in a Trout Fly?".

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    Another fine American practical angler in his day was Ted Trueblood who wrote a column for the Field and Stream. He wrote in discussing nymphs that some materials had "insectedness", i.e., they had an "insect aura" about them that is to the trout. He believed in dubbing nymphs, citing the Zug Bug and gold-ribbed Hare's Ear as examples. New Zealand anglers have "invented" their own version of the Hare's Ear with their Hare and Copper, a very basic, simple nymph but which is incredibly and widely successful.

    Many furs have a sparkle to them. Hare's fur, and to a lesser extent rabbit fur and seal's fur are three examples. Peacock herl, another very successful material, similarly has an attractiveness (to trout) and a sparkle about it.
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I can not get the meaning of "to a lesser extent".

Does the rabbit fur and seal's fur have a smaller amount of sparkle compare than the hare's fur?

OR

Are the rabbit fur and seal's fur not used so frequently like hare's fur?

If some member gave me an answer, I will really appreciate.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote smudge Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Sep 2019 at 1:44pm
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The way it's written I take it to mean that the hare's fur is sparklier than the rabbit and seal fur, although they too have some sparkle - just 'to a lesser extent'.


Best gurnard fisherman in my street
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Oct 2019 at 12:59am
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Dear smudge

Thank you for your quick reply.

Your thought about the phrase makes sense. Now I can understand what the author intended to say.

I have used hare's fur for a long time ago, but have not tied any flies with rabbit and seal's fur. If I had those three items in my material box, I could compare the amount of sparkle of them.

Thank you again for your kindness and for taking your important time.

Please enjoy the new fishing season!

go-ito
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Jaapie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Oct 2019 at 10:15am
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Seal fur is one of the best fly tying materials out there for nymphs - definitely my favourite dubbing material by far.

It seems to trap the air bubbles somehow and has an amazing translucency and natural sheen, even if it has been dyed. The scruffiness of the fibres on a beat up fly also add an element of 'life' as they splay out in all directions.

This back country caddis pattern has caught more fish than I can remember.


"Only when the last tree has died, the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught,will we realize that we cannot eat money" - 19th Century Indian Creed
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Oct 2019 at 10:44am
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Dear Jaapie

Thank you very much for answering me every time!

Your description and the photo are very useful to me.
It looks deadly effective!

I will try to get seal fur and tie the backcountry caddis pattern.

Thanks again.

Tight lines!

GO-Ito

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Jaapie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Oct 2019 at 1:03pm
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@GO-Ito

There are very few specialist retail places in New Zealand that I have seen that have a selection box of different dyed seal fur. I think the last time I saw it, it was in the Christchurch H&F store.

For a long time seal fur was supposed to be on the CITES list, but smart people simply collected the fur without the obligatory bash to the head so they got around that problem.

In my personal findings, the black, claret and natural off white are the standout colours.

To effectively dub the fur on, you really do need to wax your dubbing thread to make it 'stick' before applying the dubbing noodle. I really do try for the scruffy, buggy look in the flies and don't bother trimming the stray fibres.

Super simple to tie and to replenish the box, especially when my mates feed them to the willow trees with wayward casts.
"Only when the last tree has died, the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught,will we realize that we cannot eat money" - 19th Century Indian Creed
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Oct 2019 at 5:35pm
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Dear Jaapie

Thank you for the shop's info and detailed instruction about dubbing.

Do you know a tackle shop named "Fly Shop" of Methven, NZ?


Its website shows many dubbing materials on the following page.


My friend who lives in Hokitika, a former fishing guide, told me that the shop has a wide variety of tying materials.


By the way, can you enjoy trout fishing in October near your place?

In Japan, almost all trout fishing rivers and streams have been closed at the end of September. So I will try to tie as many flies as I can until my next fishing trip to NZ.

Tense your lines!

from GO



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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote bazza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Oct 2019 at 10:52pm
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Originally posted by GO-Ito GO-Ito wrote:

Dear Jaapie

Thank you for the shop's info and detailed instruction about dubbing.

Do you know a tackle shop named "Fly Shop" of Methven, NZ?


Its website shows many dubbing materials on the following page.


My friend who lives in Hokitika, a former fishing guide, told me that the shop has a wide variety of tying materials.
 
Hi GO-ito
 
Re your query on Oct fishing in NZ
 
Having already visited NZ you may well already be aware of the fishing seasons in various localities, nevertheless will attempt to list a rough overview.
 
A certain percentage of water in NZ is open all year but this is mostly lakes, larger rivers & places that can sustain the pressure or are "put & take" water (ie stocked therefore not reliant or suitable for natural spawning )
 
The bulk of water however is closed to allow spawning usually for 3 months namely from 30th June re opening on Oct. 1st. Conditions in Oct. will vary considerably between the Nth & Sth Islands & therefore preferred methods may reflect that.
 
Here in the Nth. Is. Oct. should signal the onset of spring but this year has been far from it ... global climate change perhaps ?
 
Hey ... congratulations on your countries impressive performance in the Rugby World Cup competition currently being hosted by Japan.
 
On a more personal note on behalf of the forum, would like to express our thanks for your contributions in the form of both comments & questions on the forum, being as far as I am aware the first if not the only fisho from Japan to do so.


By the way, can you enjoy trout fishing in October near your place?

In Japan, almost all trout fishing rivers and streams have been closed at the end of September. So I will try to tie as many flies as I can until my next fishing trip to NZ.

Tense your lines!

from GO



Remember, if you lose a sock in the dryer, it comes back as a Tupperware lid that doesn't fit any of your containers.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Jaapie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Oct 2019 at 10:54am
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@GO-Ito

Hi mate,

Steve runs the very efficient fly shop you are referring to in your post.
They are based out of Methven, some way south from actual Christchurch city.

They do a very good internet service (clicks and mortar) and just looking at the link you posted up, they do indeed sell genuine seal fur which is what you want.

On a separate note, that ice dubbing is also killer stuff!

They have a good range of colours and it's very easy to make your own colours by mixing amounts of the seal fur together to get exactly what you want. The rusty brown is almost like the claret, so I'd be inclined to add a bit of darker material just to make it naturally darker.

Just remember to mark your new creations of what you have put into the mix ratio if you want to make the same stuff again. Trust me, it really helps!Wink

I see Bazza has answered the question regarding fishing in October. As mentioned, generally October 1 is opening of the season for most rivers, but of course there are always exceptions. Best thing is to get your fishing licence and have a good read through the Sport Fishing Regulations booklet that you get with it.

Good luck with your tying - nothing more satisfying than fooling a fish into eating one of your hand tied flies.
"Only when the last tree has died, the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught,will we realize that we cannot eat money" - 19th Century Indian Creed
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2019 at 12:19am
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Dear bazza

Hi! Thank you for answering my question. Your overview is very informative and useful for me.

I used to live in Hamilton city for 3 years and enjoyed winter fishing around the rivers and streams of Waikato. I also visited Taupo area to try the famous spawning runs of trout.

You said this October does not like spring yet. I felt the same thing here in Japan. This week is still hot like summer. I think the usual four seasons are becoming just two seasons, long hotter summer and long colder winter. The comfortable spring and autumn have disappeared! It might be the global climate change...

By the way, thank you for your congratulations on the success of the Japanese rugby team. I wish they could go to the final round. The All Blacks and our team might have a match on the final!

Also, thank again for your warm words for me. I have been helped by this forum so many times and the members are so kind, knowledgeable and greatly experienced.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2019 at 12:37am
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Dear Jaapie

Hi! Have you ever visited Steve's shop?
I have not yet but got some items from him several times.
I will try the ice dubbing material!

Your tip about marking the mix ratio of each colour is really helpful.

I might have asked a little bit stupid question about the fishing in October. I read your profile then I thought you live in Guinea, west part of the African continent......

Anyway, have you gone fishing after the opening day - October 1?

I am going to visit NZ in 2023, maybe.

I wish we could meet somewhere in NZ, hopefully at the bank of a beautiful river!

Good luck,
GO
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote bazza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2019 at 3:38pm
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Konichiwa Go-Ito
 
Arigatou gozai masu tomodachi for your kind words & explanation of the current situation re freshwater fishing in Japan.
 
I have been to Japan a couple of times but have not fished there.
 
Nevertheless was pleasantly surprised to learn of the number of species available to fish for in the Hokkaido hill country ( probably more than here in NZ ) that include brown trout, rainbow trout, several varieties of salmon 5 of which are native plus yamame, iwana & the mighty sea run amemasu. All of these & more that I am given to understand are under relatively low fishing pressure considering the population of Japan.
 
Your confusion in defining the meaning of some terms in the English language is totally understandable given that it is such a crazy mixed up, non logical language where identical sounding words often spelt the same can have completely different meaning.
 
Japanese by comparison is far more logical inasmuch as a statement can be converted into question by simply adding "ka" at the end. with a few exceptions such as "hashi" (bridge or chopsticks) most words have a singular meaning. Likewise it is a relatively simple matter to change the tense between past, present or future.
 
Incidentally in your time spent in NZ did you notice how when spoken correctly that the Maori language sounds very similar to Japanese with regard to phonetics & intonation ? EG kai = food & in Japanese = mussels as a seafood.
 
Wonder if was a result of both countries did not have a written language that incorporated letters until one was formulated,Te Reo  
for Maori & Romanji for Nippon.
 
Sayonara Go-Ito ... which hereby exhausts my pitiful command of the Japanese language.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Mudfish marquand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2019 at 8:59pm
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Hi GO-ito. Would really like to see some pictures of the water you fly fish, and iwana, amago and yamame. Cheers
On the fly or not interested.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Oct 2019 at 10:43pm
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Dear Mudfish marquand

Hi! I have just posted two pictures of Amago trout as a new topic.

The name of the topic is An introduction of Japanese "Amago" trout.

https://www.fishing.net.nz/forum/topic132052_post1764208.html#1764208

So please look at it.

I will post some photos of Iwana (Japanese char) soon.

By the way, I really suprised because many forum members know about the fishes in Japan.

Cheers,

GO
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Oct 2019 at 10:23pm
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Dear bazza

Hi! Thank you for your reply.

You have much more info about fishing and the fishes in Hokkaido than me. Hokkaido island has many fishing spots that anglers living outside that area long for.

However, there is a big problem when trying to fish on the island, the brown bears! They are bigger than the Asiatic black bears of Honshu island.

Last September, I had encountered them three times in one day. The three black bears were separate individuals. On the second time, a cub was standing just close to me. I was so frightened because there might have been the mother bear near the cub.

I imagined the worst case that I was standing between them. So I looked back the other side of the bank of the stream. Fortunately, the mother bear was not there.

I put out my fishing gear in a hurry, then walked down the river to get away from the cub.

I would not go to Hokkaido to enjoy fishing because of those relatively small black bears (compare than the brown bear) made me so afraid. I do not want to think about seeing a brown bear on Hokkaido.

By the way, I was really surprised that you have a lot of knowledge about the Japanese language. It seems to me that you are a linguist or have taught English in Japan.

But from my point of view, our language, Nihon-go, is not so logical.

You do know the word "hashi" has two different meanings. However, it has the third meaning, the end/tip of an object. Furthermore, we have to learn three different Kanji characters (橋、箸、端) to express the word "hashi" and the intonation of the word subtly different depending on its meaning.



Yes, I have noticed the similarity of the word "kai". It is very interesting.

I have a dictionary of Maori place names. I use the dictionary when I look at an online map of New Zealand and enjoy the fun of Maori place names such as Waikato, Waimakariri and Waihou etc.

"Wai" means water, so there are many many places, rivers and streams in NZ as you know.

Thank you again for your very informative reply.

I wish many huge trout will take your fly!

Cheers,

GO

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote bazza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Oct 2019 at 2:35pm
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By the way, I was really surprised that you have a lot of knowledge about the Japanese language. It seems to me that you are a linguist or have taught English in Japan.
/QUOTE]
 
Thanks for the compliments my friend re my knowledge re fish in Japan & the speculation that I may be a linguist or a language sensai.
 
Far from it in fact & as someone who left school at 15 yo my English is not that flash either.
 
Nevertheless have just thought of another Japanese "AI" word namely TAI the name of the highly prized fish species often presented whole to guests at weddings for them to take home to enjoy, which as you probably know are called snapper here in NZ which is the predominate species caught in many parts albeit usually bigger than the 25 to 30cm size most valued in Japan & much of Asia.
 
You are probably too polite to say but no doubt you are unpleasantly surprised at the wastage incurred by the average Kiwi when preparing fish for the table, settling for bone free, skinned fillets discarding some of the tastiest parts such as heads, frames & belly ... something to my shame I am often guilty of but ease my conscience somewhat by giving those parts in bulk to Asian near neighbours who prefer them to fillets & make broth, soup & preserved in a salt spice/mix.
 
Cheers
 
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