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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Redfinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Sep 2018 at 4:15pm
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Titanium
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Hi Steve - taking The Tamure Kid up to the North Channel for a softbait session - launching Martins Bay at this stage anyway. Hatfields probably a reasonable option - just a big hike especially if a little lumpy first thing. Might be perfect in the morning - fingers crossed.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Sep 2018 at 7:27pm
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Titanium
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Whats the best source of Isobar maps?

I have followed weather forecasting and had a station in out back yard for many yrs,that added the official data bases.
A person who I hold in great respect is Jim Salanger.. a string of PHDs yet still explains stuff in lay terms without having to show  them off.
The best forecast data base is our NZ one.. not the Aussie, not  NOAA , the canadian , or european.Our own  MetOcean is world class plus some.
 And that is what swell map is based on 

 I have been comparing  forecast sourvce for around 6 or 7 yrs now... and for the 5 to 7 days they are consistently close.. As I said before a window may move in time.. 8 to 12 yrs.. 
And 3 to 5 days out 95% spot on
 Pencil in the 5 to 7 days ... confirm the 3 to 4 days.
 And in spring/ autumn (not so much autumn) be aware of the unstable change of season.

And for bars , watch the wind, several days before, well out in the tasman...check swell height... if low .. THEN check the period.. big period low swell is that so called 'BS freak wave'.. then follow that up with tide times to cross... and count your waves in a set AND the sets..
Any old school.. pre leg rope, tea shirt and baggies(no wetsuit) surfer will tell you that..many hrs sitting up on sand dunes mid winter, counting sets...

How many here can read or know how to read a barometer?
 Or even know its about ther change when REGULARLY tapped, NOT what it reads?
How many know the types of cloud and what they mean when out on the water?
 Basic boating skills...same as knowing how to take a compass bearing  and then know where you are... how many know how to do that? If you havnt a compass use your watch.. even if digital.

This is all basic .. very basic old school stuff...add that to our modern technology...
Its not rocket science...
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote piwikiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Sep 2018 at 6:20am
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Good points Steps although rocket science may be easier 😀
So much technology now its easy to get lazy. Case in point Port of Tauranga site has a glitch where clock is changing but wind speed isnt. It was like that last week too. But my old time skills came into play as I looked out the window to confirm it was 0 knots not 20 😀
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Sep 2018 at 8:33am
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Titanium
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Sry got a bit grumpy...
The number times I have posted up how to read isobars / tide current combo, over the last few yrs....and some ppl just dont.. sry never get it it...
The rocket science had been done by the scientists over the last 150 yrs.. collecting data , patterns and putting them into predictions... and putting satletilres in the sky
As far back as the 70s and 80s we where still relying on balloons, and remote coastal stations for data.. long term.. even short term forecasting was poor to say the least.
 Now they dont have to rely on limited coastal stuff, bouys in the oceans, can see what is out in the oceans, in real time.
 Thats the rocket science.

We have got so lazy, we look at the weather forcast on TV and watch the wind and rain icons on their maps...
Not even bothering to look or try to understand basics like isobars.
 It like trying to do long division on paper and haven't learnt how to add or subtract...or  recognize numbers.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Barrie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 10:49am
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Titanium
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I use
I use that as a good guide for the next week when deciding on what I intend doing. Closer to day I start using the met service then i use the rain radar through the day (unless we are in the middle of a lager high of course.

There was a guy that use to be a member on here that lived in the wellington area and he use to forcast tidal flow based on the high and low pressure. From memory he would sometimes predict that the tide in the cook straight would flow for say 8 hours in one direction due to a high pressure system of one coast and a low pressure system of the other coast. He was very accurate and a guy I use to totally enjoy his posts and emails 
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 1:51pm
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Great info, Barrie.

A mate of mine used to say look at the isobars/pressure over Tasmania, and it's basically what we will have in 3-4 days.
A bit simplistic, and reliant on a traditional SW flow (ie. not a cyclone low coming down from the Pacific), but kind of reflects the emphasis others have said on here re isobars.

The problem is when you're trying to book leave or a charter, and are wondering if it's worth it (say a week ahead). What I'm reading on here is that basically nobody knows that far out.

It's not like we need to be told to use our eyes when we arrive at the ramp/beach and note that it's different from the forecast.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Sep 2018 at 3:44pm
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Titanium
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A mate of mine used to say look at the isobars/pressure over Tasmania, and it's basically what we will have in 3-4 days.
A bit simplistic,

 Yep that is how it was basically done pre satilte and ocean bouys..
 Exept we only had the data from balloons sent up from Aussie.
Angd we where chatting the other night and m8 said the same thing.
What we now have, is forecast maps based on decades of data, and LIVE satellite images.

So why look at todays isobars over the tasman in the herald and guess?... 1950s / 60s method..
When can get the latest forecasts , updated every few ours going out for 12 or 14 plus days?.. very actrate for the next 3 to 5 days  and reasonably 7 to 12 days?

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote feeder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2018 at 7:55am
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Barrie is onto it, I use the same site for westcoast fishing and tie that to buoy weather for a 16 day forecast.
Most of our weather comes from the west so it is handy to see what is coming and make an informed decision from that.
 
Cheers
The only bar to frequent is the Kawhia Bar
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