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Soft transoms in older fibreglass boats

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    Posted: 11 Aug 2019 at 6:26pm
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Silver
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When did manufacturers like haines sea nymph figlass etc quit using significant amounts of wood when laying up transoms, stringers, floors etc. Is there a date after which these hulls became more or less free of the potential for the wooden reinforcing/components to rot or are there still ongoing issues with some makes?
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MacSkipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2019 at 7:08am
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Titanium
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I am no expert but what I have seen posted it is more to do with outboard being installed and correct application and the right materials used at that time and if reinstalled later?
Wrong transom bolts, sealant and big issues down track.  A repower and not done as originally done or damage that has not been repaired early?
Good fishing trip nothing breaks, great trip catch fish.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2019 at 11:29am
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Titanium
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Timber is still used in these applications..
 As to stringers, many where laid with  a tissue paper type former
 If done right the strength is in the shap of the glass over, not the wooden stringer inside.
 Think about it, its not much more than a bit of kindling ply wood that can .. and it is able to be snapped with your hands without using a leg.



you will find most of the 'survivor boats are those of manufactures that had factory managers that where picky as to how the boats where laid up and rolled out ...and those that have not survived where brands and boat that where not well built on the production line.

What is the background to the query?
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote OneWayTraffic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Aug 2019 at 11:13pm
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Platinum
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Certainly for many fibreglass boats the strength is all in the glass, but some designs do have some beefy wood in the stringers. Tolman skiffs have two 2by6 versalam (Laminated wood with veneers all running down the stringer.) I do not think that I could break that over my knee.  Smile

Of course that's a plywood epoxy boat. 

On topic I know that Tristram still use Marine ply in the transoms. I assume the stringers as well. If I owned one I would be epoxy sealing the outboard holes when resealing as many tube sealants tend to let go eventually. 


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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Aug 2019 at 9:31am
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Titanium
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On topic I know that Tristram still use Marine ply in the transoms. I assume the stringers as well. If I owned one I would be epoxy sealing the outboard holes when resealing as many tube sealants tend to let go eventually.

 Sealing the outboard and ANY OTHER fixtures on the transom is done with a marine grade urethane product by the outboard installers.
 Regardless of type of build
 It is not a trisram issue, at all, as you imply.

I have a 40yr old ply stringer / keel/ framed and transom boat.. all built with marine ply... The only issue have had, and is common on keeled boats with brass keel strips, is loose screws causing water to get into the keel cavity.
 Easy fix, remove screws, drill out back to good wood and inject epoxy to enable good grip to the keel strip screws.
 All able to be done in place on the trailer for under $50




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