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Questions about sea-run brown trout fishing.

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    Posted: 25 Oct 2019 at 10:13am
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Dear forum members,

Hello! How is your fishing this spring?

Thank you for helping me all the times.

I have got other questions in the book "Serious about Trout Fishing" by Tony Orman and John Morton.


Q1
In chapter 20, Mr Morton wrote: "A short cast quartering across and slightly down-current, allows the flies to swing in towards the bank."

Does the first part of this sentence mean

"make a short cast across and down with a slightly smaller angle from 45 degrees (maybe 35 - 40)"

or

"make a short cast across and down with angle of 45 degrees then drift the fly slightly downstream"?


Q2

"Sea-run trout have rather soft mouths and it is not always a certainty that you will land them, no matter how well you thought they have taken."

Does this sentence mean

"Sea-run trout have very soft mouths than ordinary browns"

or

"Sea-run trout have a bit softer mouths than ordinary browns"?

My English dictionary has these two different meanings and I have no experience about the fishing with sea-runners. So I have been confusing.


Q3

"Quite often the take sets the hook well back in the trout's mouth, especially if it was a take from a following fish cruising up the bank, and in this case the chances are that it will make short work of the nylon once the fight is really on."

I can not understand "it will make short work of the nylon....".

I guess the meaning might be

"in this case the chances are that the nylon tippet/leader would be broken by the sharp teeth of the sea-run browns once the fight is really on.".


I reckon you must be busy with your job and fishing, so if someone had plenty of time or got very bored, please answer my queries.

Cheers,
GO-Ito

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Jaapie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Oct 2019 at 10:35am
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Hi mate,
Hopefully this helps.


Q1.
I don't think you need to over think this.
The technique they want to employ is swinging the flies at the end of the drift. It makes little difference on the angle you cast in the beginning.
To be exact though, the author suggests an angle greater than 45 degrees as this would be slightly down, so perhaps 50+ degrees. If you are still confused I'll put up a diagram.
Make your cast and let the current take the flies and let them swing at the end of the drift to achieve what it is you are trying to copy.

Q2.
That makes no sense at all.
Sea run trout are the same as brown trout except they are in estuarine water.

What I am perhaps reading into this is that the author might suggest they have softer mouths than salmon as a lot of anglers target salmon and catch the sea run browns as a by-catch on surf casting gear and rip the mouths off the fish with aggressive techniques.
The sea run browns definitely have softer mouths than salmon. In fly fishing, the mouths on browns hold up just fine to a hook unless you winch them in.

Q3.
Your understanding is correct.
The fish swallows the fly and the is hooked deep in the mouth or throat and the nylon connected to the fly is rubbed by the teeth or the rough mouth parts and it damages the line.
It usually doesn't take long to rub through if you are fishing very light tippets.
"Only when the last tree has died, the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught,will we realize that we cannot eat money" - 19th Century Indian Creed
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Oct 2019 at 12:42pm
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Dear Jaapie,


Thank you for your very quick reply and detailed answers.

They have helped me so much!


I am going to read your answers once more and read the book carefully to understand it correctly.


I've heard that the famous Izaac Walton once said:


"Angling may be said to be so like the mathematics that it can never be fully learnt."


I can't learn and master English completely....


Thank you again, and tight lines!


GO

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote GO-Ito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Oct 2019 at 8:45am
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Hi Jaappie!

I have drawn a diagram to confirm my understanding for your answer about Q1.

Is it right?  I do know that I don't need to over think that sentence.

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Jaapie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Oct 2019 at 9:27am
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Exactly right.Thumbs Up
"Only when the last tree has died, the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught,will we realize that we cannot eat money" - 19th Century Indian Creed
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote bazza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Oct 2019 at 9:29am
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In my limited experience works best if rod is swung almost parallel down river the same as is often done after the normal drift whilst nymphing is almost exhausted & in preparation of the next upriver cast.
 
This will cause the nymph or fly to swing in a line some distance directly down stream below you ( the opposite of what needs to be achieved on the drift ) resulting in a tug felt as everything straightens out & the final whip around is completed, which can take longer than expected. It is at this point that a fish is most likely to strike, perhaps out of curiosity or from having identified it as a small fish or some form of food source trying to escape.
 
Am certain most if not all anglers here will have also encountered such an unexpected "bonus" many times but like myself probably only accounting for maybe 1 in 10 or 12  hooked also with a higher % of fish lost possibly due to the hook not imbedding in a firmer part or the corner of the fishes mouth. 
 
Actually am finding the topic of this thread rather timely as was considering posting re our unusual experience about 10 days ago & to ask for suggestions as to the cause.
 
As already mentioned we have found such downstream hook-ups
on the "swing" usually have only accounted for 10% or less of hook-ups yet on this occasion accounted for 90% or more with "never fail" upriver drifts only 5 or 10% of the hook-ups ... why the sudden reversal ?
 
Could it be due to any or a combination of the following factors ?
 
(1) River had only just cleared from heavy rain & maybe had provided a bounty of food that was readily accessible in the calmer tail end of the pools rather than expend energy at the top of the runs.
 
(2) The fish were simply resting after gorging themselves & had merely responded to a possible food source presenting itself in an unusual manner.  
 
(3) Any other reason/s.
Remember, if you lose a sock in the dryer, it comes back as a Tupperware lid that doesn't fit any of your containers.
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