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Cray/Crab Pots off the yak

Printed From: The Fishing Website
Category: Saltwater Fishing
Forum Name: Yak Yak Yak
Forum Description: The forum for Kayak enthusiasts
URL: https://www.fishing.net.nz/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=55867
Printed Date: 16 Apr 2024 at 10:12am


Topic: Cray/Crab Pots off the yak
Posted By: Jimm
Subject: Cray/Crab Pots off the yak
Date Posted: 29 Jul 2010 at 5:07pm

hey guys i love eating crabs and have always wanted to get a crab pot but wondering if theres any complications of doing this from the yak?  I got a ocean cabo 5m tandem yak that I use for fishing so plenty of room to have a crab pot on board..

anyone ever done this?  wondering the same about cray pots which are heavier than cray pots but the though of getting a couple of crays off the yak would be awesome! 



Replies:
Posted By: piwikiwi
Date Posted: 30 Jul 2010 at 3:20pm
Jim Rainbow has done the craypotting thing in the Naki with great sucess. Now he doesnt like crayfish anymore LOL
PM him or hopefully he will read this sometime soon.


Posted By: Phishpula
Date Posted: 30 Jul 2010 at 3:25pm
Seen a few pots put out but nothing gathered. As Piwi said, Rainbow seems to be the expert on catching bugs from a yak

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Turtle free since 2012


Posted By: Raumatibeach
Date Posted: 30 Jul 2010 at 4:34pm
I've got plenty of crabs in pots off my yak, you don't seem to have to go very deep to get them either.

Hoop netting for crays might be a lighter option for you if you're worried about the weight.


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Get off my lawn....


Posted By: yakkaman
Date Posted: 30 Jul 2010 at 4:56pm
Jim I'm looking at the square collaspables cray pots on trade me.
 
I do alot of crabbing I just drop a small bike rim weighted and haul up every couple of minutes I get a feed of big ones and smallies go on the hook.
 
Makes great burley too!!!


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100% Fishing!!!


Posted By: merman
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2010 at 4:35pm

  - I just drop a small bike rim weighted -


Clap  good old kiwi ingenuity, good one yakkaman Thumbs Up

I have a square  collapse able one like on tm, if any one in chch wants to borrow it(not forever) pm me



Posted By: Youngfisherman
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2010 at 4:48pm
If you want really light weight crab pot buy one of those jarvis walker crab pots $20 where i buy them. For paddle crabs you would only really need to go out about chest deep, also my dad reckons crabbing on a full moon aint worth it. If you use the jarvis walker pot tie a rope onto a empty 1L milk bottle and tie the other end to the pot. helps a little if you weight it couple of sinkers 


Posted By: Naki man
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2010 at 5:53pm
Are there any regulations on net size for crabs

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The solution to any problem - work, money, love, whatever - is to go fishing - the worse the problem the longer the fishing trip should be.

"I have a lot of very large problems"


Posted By: piwikiwi
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2010 at 7:02pm
Your old jockey white y fronts made of mesh may let your crabs out nakiman Smile


Posted By: Youngfisherman
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2010 at 7:39pm
no mesh size but they have to be able to escape(i think), limit of 50 in welly and no size limit too but softies, babys and females in berry should be returned.


Posted By: Rainbow
Date Posted: 02 Aug 2010 at 9:11pm
 
Jim   Catching crabs and crays are two differnt things.   You can catch crabs during the day but for crays it is best to leave pots overnight.    Also for each species you need different pots that are not really interchangeable since craypots have  to have escape ports.     I don't do crabs so can only comment on crays.     I have tried the warehouse collapsible net pots and despite modifications I do not think they catch well.    I strongly suspect that these pots move slightly under the influence of the buoy and that could put crays off from climbing up.    At first I blamed the net mesh so put in a carpet mat to climb on.    Was a bit better but all in all they are not good catchers.    I kept a record that verifies it.     I also use a Kaikoura Pot which is OK but expensive and has some minor design issues.    These are:  Design is rectangular so since you never know how they sit in the prevaling wave action they can get pulled over by the pull of the buoy if they sit broadside to the strong waves/current.   I also believe the bait cage is too far from the funnel.    
 
My most consistant pot is a commercial beehive or round pot made from No8 wire.    I built in an externally accessible bait cage with a mat lid that also acts like a ladder.    On some I have used a sleeve funnel made by cutting up a plastic flower pot but dont think this is essential.  No additional weight is needed for that and the Kaikoura.     
 
I use the smallest tear drop buoys.    The 4mm rope is attached to a three string bridle with a small float to keep it clear of the funnel.     The rope is threaded through the hole in the buoy and its end has a shark clip fastened.     This allows me to adjust the rope lenght to the depth of the water without the need to tie off additional rope in a bundle near the buoy.    The reason why I do this to avoid having too much rope floating on the surface potentially being cut by a propellor.    The shark clip keeps any spare rope from floating anyway.    
 
With such small buoys none of my pots have walked through wave action but I did have a couple stolen.    Best buoy colour is red.     Best time to set them out is late afternoon so that the bait is still fresh and gives off good scent.    Best time to check them is at daybreak before others do that for you.    For bait use fish frames.   I just use KY and gurnard frames or any othe fish that I have on hand.
 
Have not set mine for month since nobody in my family is too keen on them.    However, they make very good pressies.
 
Finally I have no problems pulling them up from the P13.   Heaviest load where 8 large males all around 1.5-2kg.      On that day there was at least a 3m swell and forced me to make an allout desperation heave to get the pot onto my lap.   Bugger when you have to throw a couple back especially when you pulled empty pots a few mornings in a row.   I wear an old pair of fishing waders as the bugs dig their claws into anything they can grab.    When pulling up dont store line on you lap as you never know what can happen.    Spill it as you pull it up much like I pull up my anchor rope.
 
Hope this helps although a bit long.    
 
Rainbow 
 
Oh I nealy forgot.    I paddle out with one pot sitting on the bow hatch cover and one on the rear well.   They are not tied on so if something happens they can fall off.    All the line is checked and the bait cage filled at the ramp so that I dont have to muck around out there undoing tangles and baiting pots.    You dont want to take your eyes and mind off the surrounding sea for too long especially in big waves and strong wind which can greet you when you have to check your pots next morning.  
 
Always approach your buoy upwind (If you come at it from the downwind side you will drift over the rope which is not safe practice).   Grab the buoy with one hand and hold it.    With the other store the paddle in the paddle bungie.   I had to change the bungie to make one hand operation easier.  
 
Remember handling bulky cray pots from a yak in all sorts of conditions  can be dangerous so work out an operating  system that is safe and stick to it.     


Posted By: Youngfisherman
Date Posted: 03 Aug 2010 at 8:57am
Hey rainbow, never heard of catching crabs during the day, thought they only come out after sunset.


Posted By: Rainbow
Date Posted: 03 Aug 2010 at 12:37pm
There you learnt something new.    I often paddle past guys in boats just outside of the New Plymouth  harbour catching heaps of crabs in bright day light.    They are also a pest stealing my bait off the hooks, even swimming up a meter to latch onto it.
 
Rainbow


Posted By: Jimm
Date Posted: 03 Aug 2010 at 1:44pm
cheers for the excellent detail rainbow mate! 
 
where abouts can I get myself one of those beehive cray pots? looked on trademe and fishing stores but haven't found any.. just looking at the photos, are there any escape holes on this type of pot - (fisheries regulations?)
 
Yakkaman you use a bike wheel rim to catch crabs? do you add any netting to the rim or just the plan rim is enough to snag em? how do you add the bait to this contraption?  are crabs just about everywhere or only at certain types of beaches (ie sandy or rocky?)


Posted By: Rainbow
Date Posted: 03 Aug 2010 at 5:17pm
Probably at Hunting and Fishing stores or other marine outlets.    They are pretty standard.    Only buy the pot and all the other stuff yourself.    A 2 litre plastic milk bottle will do as a buoy for a start.   Write your name an phone number on it to make it legal.     30m  x 4mm polyprop rope from Mitre 10 is pretty cheap too.    
 
Rainbow


Posted By: Raumatibeach
Date Posted: 03 Aug 2010 at 8:02pm
Originally posted by Youngfisherman Youngfisherman wrote:

Hey rainbow, never heard of catching crabs during the day, thought they only come out after sunset.


I do my crab fishing during the day, leave your bait out in the sun so it reeks a bit first.I a half full pot in an hour or so sometimes, kot of small ones though.

This might help you, http://www.sit-on-topkayaking.com/Articles/FishDive/KayakCrabbing.htm


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Get off my lawn....


Posted By: yakkaman
Date Posted: 03 Aug 2010 at 9:37pm
Originally posted by Jim33037 Jim33037 wrote:

cheers for the excellent detail rainbow mate! 
  
Yakkaman you use a bike wheel rim to catch crabs? do you add any netting to the rim or just the plan rim is enough to snag em? how do you add the bait to this contraption?  are crabs just about everywhere or only at certain types of beaches (ie sandy or rocky?)
 
I have mesh with 4 hooks they hold bait in place and twenty oz sinker drops to bottom, best over sand. I just anchor up and fish pull up crabs in between if i was lucky enough to catch that elusive big fish then drop ya bouys and away me hearties
 
Oh yeah 20in rims fine just make mesh or netting loose so when you lift they stay inside you can get 8-10 at a time stinky bait!!!
 
Probably illegal but a dozens a feed


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100% Fishing!!!


Posted By: Jimm
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2010 at 2:10pm

rainbow mate i notice that a lot of craypots have a plastic entrance like the one you have here (the red plastic at the main entrance): what's the purpose of this and did you make this yourself?  Best reason i can think of is it's a surface which prevents the crays climbing back out through the main entrance of the trap?  do these plastic collars increase catch rate by much?



Posted By: Rainbow
Date Posted: 13 Aug 2010 at 11:46pm
Jim   You can use anything that fits, plastic bucket, plant pots,  etc.     It probably makes climbing out harder, that is all.    Dont worry about the colour as the saying goes : "in the dark every cow is black".    I dont use collars anymore and still catch my share.    Very often they are used in commercial pots that have no wire funnel.
 
Rainbow


Posted By: pulsin
Date Posted: 14 Aug 2010 at 6:32am
what an awesome detailed post thanks for that, i have  a small 13ft boat and would love to try and catch crays, i like the look of the round pots, does anyone know where i can get these in auckland, also i have heard there are crays in and around Narrow Neck reef, is this true? can anyone point me in the general direction of where else i might try, i usually launch from either, HMB, KK bay, Okahu bay.
cheers


Posted By: tga fisher
Date Posted: 16 Aug 2010 at 1:50pm
Very helpful Rainbow - had thought about this from a boat but not from a yak. Cheers


Posted By: merman
Date Posted: 10 Nov 2010 at 7:10pm
    Rainbow do you think two of those round wire pots will be a tight sqeeze on a 4.5 ocean all at once and a bit awkward or you think do 1 of them then back for another. I dont plan on goin far just  close to shore where I can see the floats along kaikoura coast while I camp the night  . looking at buying two of tm but only person is in whakatane price seems ok  


Posted By: Rainbow
Date Posted: 12 Nov 2010 at 10:42am

Merman

I would suggest your try one at a time at first so that you get your handling routine sorted out.    Of course it all depends on the area and sea conditions where you intend to set them.    I set mine off a P13 so you should have no trouble with your 4.5.    Put one on your foot well but far enough forward so that you can paddle but still have the wires sitting on your tip of your booties for better balance.    Also make sure you have the rope and buoy sorted out before you launch as this avoids tangles that are a real hassle to undo at sea.    

When you got your routine together try the other pot across your rear well.    Always set the foot well one first so that you can sit side saddle when you bring the rear one forward.    Never tie pots to you yak.   It is better to lose one in rough seas than to can out with the pots holding the yak upside down.
 
Good luck
 
Rainbow


Posted By: Pnut
Date Posted: 27 Jan 2012 at 11:15pm
Hi Rainbow, awesome info for a cray newbie like me!
Just wondering about those no.8 pots, do they have the regulation holes required?
Does anyone know where to get those in Auckland?


Posted By: Rainbow
Date Posted: 28 Jan 2012 at 4:41pm
Any cray pot sold in a fishing shop should comply with the regs regarding escape slots.    As an aside my guess is that you might discover that in Auckland buying cray pots will be easier that finding crays.
 
Rainbow


Posted By: boydee
Date Posted: 28 Jan 2012 at 5:23pm
haha^^
Great info Rainbow thanks


Posted By: fear no fish
Date Posted: 29 Jan 2012 at 12:22pm
I have a lot of success getting crays of the yak. I have 2 round collapsable pots which are weighted so they stay put. I have moderate success with these when I use them.

What I have a lot of success with is ring potting. A steel ring (bike rims work too) about 3ft in diameter with a net on the bottom. Similar to what yakkaman described earlier. Like a big landing net but without the handle. 3 point saddle for keeping it level on the drop and lift. Tie lots of bait (usually a couple of cod bodies or similar) in the bottom drop them down to soak for about 20 minutes and haul them up, bingo. Best lift for 1 pot was 13 crays, but only 4 were keepers, bugger.

The catch, yes there is one with this method. As crays become active at dusk, you need to be prepared to be on the water at night, in the dark! Not possible around a lot of our coastline and I only do it on nice calm nights. In saying that you do not need to go far. The main spot I go to I would be no more than 100m from the beach and in 2-10m of water. At New Year most of the crays I got were in 2-4m of water. I usually go out for a couple of hours max and it is a rare occasion when I go back to shore without my quota. I have 3 of these pots and drop them at about 5 minute intervals and then all you do is paddle a little circuit lifting the pots. 

Essential equipment
Headlamp - for getting the little buggers out of the net
Glow Sticks - tape one to each bouy, makes them a lot easier to find in a swell
Measure - I find I get quite a few shorties so measure them on the water
Catch Bag - or something to put your catch in (an old sack works)
Fishfinder - great for picking drop offs/shelfs where the little buggers might be hiding
Yak and paddle are helpful tooThumbs Up

Sorry Orca & Nuke Chook, our secret is out, but its too good not to share. And when I say "I" you know I mean "we" Tongue


Posted By: Pnut
Date Posted: 29 Jan 2012 at 1:37pm
Originally posted by fear no fish fear no fish wrote:

What I have a lot of success with is ring potting. A steel ring (bike rims work too) about 3ft in diameter with a net on the bottom. Similar to what yakkaman described earlier. Like a big landing net but without the handle. 3 point saddle for keeping it level on the drop and lift. Tie lots of bait (usually a couple of cod bodies or similar) in the bottom drop them down to soak for about 20 minutes and haul them up, bingo. Best lift for 1 pot was 13 crays, but only 4 were keepers, bugger.
Hey that's pretty cool! So do you let the ring sit there and they just craw inside looking for the bait, then pull it up and the net stops them swimming away? i have read mixed feelings about the cheap square ali frames, not sure weather to get one to try or spend the extra for the round wire types like Rainbow was on about, or try something like your net.

Rainbow, you are probably right, even got to be a good day to catch fish in Auckland harbour LOL
We go out just north of Whangaporoa, fishing is pretty good normally and we have heard of a few spots to try for cray's. I'm not expecting much but want to give it a go.


Posted By: fear no fish
Date Posted: 29 Jan 2012 at 2:56pm
Hi Pnut. Yep, thats the plan. When pulling them up you can't stop or they will get out. Still lose the out one getting the net out of the water and onto the yak.

Haven't tried the square ones. At the end of the day, with the right bait, in the right spot, they should all catch crays....some just seem to be better than others.


Posted By: maseofspades007
Date Posted: 22 Nov 2022 at 12:17am
Hey Rainbow mate, can you use a normal small craypot for crayfish, or do they have to be a certain size, and made of metal? Just curious, as I've seen the name used interchangeably i.e- Cray/crab pot. I'm in Auckland, not sure I'd have much luck out these ways. How deep do you have to go for crays? Or does that depend on where you are I suppose. Any info would be fan-f**ken-tastic. Thanking you in Advance


Posted By: maseofspades007
Date Posted: 22 Nov 2022 at 12:36am
Did you figure out where to get the correct craypots for auckland bud? I'm still looking


Posted By: maseofspades007
Date Posted: 22 Nov 2022 at 12:41am
I have the same round pots that are collapsible. Whats the best thing to weight them. I don't want to weight them too much, as I'd have to pull them up when there's crays in there, however i want to know the best weight to keep them still? Any info will be awesome cheers mate. 


Posted By: maseofspades007
Date Posted: 22 Nov 2022 at 12:45am
Originally posted by fear no fish fear no fish wrote:

I have a lot of success getting crays of the yak. I have 2 round collapsable pots which are weighted so they stay put. I have moderate success with these when I use them.

What I have a lot of success with is ring potting. A steel ring (bike rims work too) about 3ft in diameter with a net on the bottom. Similar to what yakkaman described earlier. Like a big landing net but without the handle. 3 point saddle for keeping it level on the drop and lift. Tie lots of bait (usually a couple of cod bodies or similar) in the bottom drop them down to soak for about 20 minutes and haul them up, bingo. Best lift for 1 pot was 13 crays, but only 4 were keepers, bugger.

The catch, yes there is one with this method. As crays become active at dusk, you need to be prepared to be on the water at night, in the dark! Not possible around a lot of our coastline and I only do it on nice calm nights. In saying that you do not need to go far. The main spot I go to I would be no more than 100m from the beach and in 2-10m of water. At New Year most of the crays I got were in 2-4m of water. I usually go out for a couple of hours max and it is a rare occasion when I go back to shore without my quota. I have 3 of these pots and drop them at about 5 minute intervals and then all you do is paddle a little circuit lifting the pots. 

Essential equipment
Headlamp - for getting the little buggers out of the net
Glow Sticks - tape one to each bouy, makes them a lot easier to find in a swell
Measure - I find I get quite a few shorties so measure them on the water
Catch Bag - or something to put your catch in (an old sack works)
Fishfinder - great for picking drop offs/shelfs where the little buggers might be hiding
Yak and paddle are helpful tooThumbs Up

Sorry Orca & Nuke Chook, our secret is out, but its too good not to share. And when I say "I" you know I mean "we" Tongue

Brilliant info there mate, thanking you



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