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Knives

Printed From: The Fishing Website
Category: Saltwater Fishing
Forum Name: The Briny Bar
Forum Description: The place for general chat on saltwater fishing!
URL: https://www.fishing.net.nz/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=136662
Printed Date: 19 Aug 2022 at 11:27pm


Topic: Knives
Posted By: smudge
Subject: Knives
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 3:20pm
I have a few, nothing super flash but they work well. What you're used to are what seem to work best. Here's a selection of some favourites that I sharpened today. Some hunting knives, some utility knives and of course some fishing/filleting knives. You can never have too many. Anyway, these are my favourites but I have many more.



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Best gurnard fisherman in my street



Replies:
Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 3:22pm
Two are hand made, one by myself and one from my mate. Can you guess which ones?


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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 3:25pm
There are only four with wooden handles (scales) Smudge!

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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 3:51pm
The clever and the one by the stone??

Feel as though I missing out.Only have 3x 2 bait knives and 1 filleting kept in the garage so her indoors doesnt use it.


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Amateur's built the ark. Professional built the Titanic


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 4:31pm
Like fishing rods, you can never have enough. I would have two or three times as many, those are just the ones I use. They aren't all fishing knives though

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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: bazza
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 4:45pm
I have repeatedly have watched a video of guy seemingly effortlessly filleting snapper of varying size using a brand of locally
manufactured knives, cutting thru scales,belly & back pin bones honing them only occasionally ... they are not expensive so decided I would buy a range of about four of them along with a diamond honing stick.

Maybe my technique is lacking something but none of them perform
for me like those in the video & slicing thru the bones & scales remains an effort as does removing a tidy fillet after doing so, plus they seem to require regular honing with the diamond sharpener.

Am hoping on this occasion will prove  to be the exception to the common saying " Cannot teach an old dog new tricks" 

Post edit :- Not suggesting there is anything wrong with the brand ...
can't be as smudge appears to have three in his collection, so I must be using mine badly !


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When you cry, feel pain or sadness, no one notices your sorrow .... BUT
fart just ONE time !!!!!!!!!!!


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 4:56pm
There is no need to slice through bones. I do chomp through the pin bones but that's not so bad and I do fillet gurnard with one cut. Doing the same with snapper - especially big ones isn't such a good thing.

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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Skoti
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 5:16pm
Originally posted by smudge smudge wrote:

Two are hand made, one by myself and one from my mate. Can you guess which ones?
4th from the left and 3rd from the right ?

You should put up a pic of all the knives Arron has lost off the boat LOL


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COVID is no joke !
One former patient was so brain damaged after , he thought he won an election he lost by 7 million votes .


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 5:27pm
Originally posted by Skoti Skoti wrote:

Originally posted by smudge smudge wrote:

Two are hand made, one by myself and one from my mate. Can you guess which ones?
4th from the left and 3rd from the right ?

You should put up a pic of all the knives Arron has lost off the boat LOL

The screen isn't wide enough for that Skoti


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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 5:29pm
Originally posted by smudge smudge wrote:

Originally posted by Skoti Skoti wrote:

Originally posted by smudge smudge wrote:

Two are hand made, one by myself and one from my mate. Can you guess which ones?
4th from the left and 3rd from the right ?

You should put up a pic of all the knives Arron has lost off the boat LOL

The screen isn't wide enough for that Skoti

And yes, 4th from the left (Neil) and 3rd from the right is my own creation


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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 23 Apr 2022 at 10:06pm
Like you smudge I've collected a few knives over the years.  You do go back to the old favourites one of mine being a homemade carbon steel knife I inherited from my father.  I expect it was made by my grandfather.
What is the knife with the orange handle?  My first thoughts were that it was a Swibo but the blade shape doesn't look right.  Fish skinning knife?


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 10:33am
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

Like you smudge I've collected a few knives over the years.  You do go back to the old favourites one of mine being a homemade carbon steel knife I inherited from my father.  I expect it was made by my grandfather.
What is the knife with the orange handle?  My first thoughts were that it was a Swibo but the blade shape doesn't look right.  Fish skinning knife?

It's a Svord Kiwi Machete. It's like a 3/4 size machete. I did have a Swibo but I left it on someone's boat I think. Or at someone's place. Or it could still be hiding somewhere. Good knives


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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 1:46pm
I see Svord knives are made in NZ.  Are they any good?  I don't recall seeing them in my neck of the woods.


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 4:18pm
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

I see Svord knives are made in NZ.  Are they any good?  I don't recall seeing them in my neck of the woods.

Yes, they are made in NZ & not only that they are made in Waiuku which is where I am. I have never been to the factory & I don't even know where they are Big smile but yeah somewhere local to me. They are predominately hand crafted (on a mass produced type scale) carbon steel knife and are pretty good to be fair. Of course you pay a premium or a knife like that and a lot of people grizzle because they rust. Wacko

That is the nature of carbon steel but I think some salespeople possibly miss that snippet out.

As a practical knife IMO SS is hard to beat. You just wouldn't be allowed to use a carbon steel knife as a professional butcher/filleter these days due tio the rust issues, but they are still cool. A good quality stainless will keep an edge. Carbon steel knives need way more attention than stainless knives and really they are no better. They are just cool because you have to look after them Big smile



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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 5:12pm
Waiuku ........... it's been a long time since I was in your neighourhood.  In fact it was in 1970.  I was part of an educational tour / visit of the steel mills.  I clearly recall the words of the guide as we were wandering through the plant.  He said 'if the alarms go off don't bother running, the explosion will wipe this place off the face of the earth'.  That was about the full extent of the safety talk.  How times have changed.


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 5:26pm
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

Waiuku ........... it's been a long time since I was in your neighourhood.  In fact it was in 1970.  I was part of an educational tour / visit of the steel mills.  I clearly recall the words of the guide as we were wandering through the plant.  He said 'if the alarms go off don't bother running, the explosion will wipe this place off the face of the earth'.  That was about the full extent of the safety talk.  How times have changed.

Hehe I went there as a school kid about that time, now I work there. It hasn't exploded yet Big smile


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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Tonto2
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 6:40pm
As I am **** with knives, what would be a good ss filleting knife and where would I buy 1 from? Cheers

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slowly going where everyone else has already been


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 7:03pm
The Victory Diogenes 22cm has a good reputation.  Others will have their favourites.  Here is a link for you.
https://www.marine-deals.co.nz/filleting-knives/victory-diogenes-ga150-fish-fillet-knife-22cm" rel="nofollow - https://www.marine-deals.co.nz/filleting-knives/victory-diogenes-ga150-fish-fillet-knife-22cm

There is also a slim blade model.

Some more info here.
http://www.filletfish.com.au/info/filleting-knives" rel="nofollow - https://www.filletfish.com.au/info/filleting-knives


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 7:07pm
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

The Victory Diogenes 22cm has a good reputation.  Others will have their favourites.  Here is a link for you.
https://www.marine-deals.co.nz/filleting-knives/victory-diogenes-ga150-fish-fillet-knife-22cm" rel="nofollow - https://www.marine-deals.co.nz/filleting-knives/victory-diogenes-ga150-fish-fillet-knife-22cm

There is also a slim blade model.
Have the slim blade model,does the job considering I am not a great filleter,neighbours love my heads and frames with the amount of flesh still attached

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Amateur's built the ark. Professional built the Titanic


Posted By: Tonto2
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 7:49pm
They seem pretty reasonable price wise, is it worth paying more for a filleting knife, better brand quality?

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slowly going where everyone else has already been


Posted By: Tonto2
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 7:56pm
Ah that was a good informative link. Cheers

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slowly going where everyone else has already been


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 9:56pm
Edit

Tonto2 - I may have confused things.
Has the knife in the pic below been rebranded as a Victory GA151/22? 






Posted By: kitno
Date Posted: 24 Apr 2022 at 9:56pm
And here I was thinking you only had a drinking problem smudge. Clearly I was wrong.


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Top 10 finish
2023 Grunter Hunter.


Posted By: kimber7wsm
Date Posted: 25 Apr 2022 at 6:08am
Personally, I never had much luck with the victory knives. Don't like them at all.

Knives are a bit like Softbait rods, what one person likes another hates.

I used to use a Victorinox Curved boning knife as I like a stiffer blade. It was a bit short on the bigger snapper.

I did get a Duel filleting knife (another NZ brand) through a deal at Marine-deals. I really like it for a flexible filleting knife. Holds an edge really well, easy to sharpen. The handle is really good, even when greasy. I find it much better than the victory range. It is the DK4B. I really like the look of the DK9, so might get one of those.


Posted By: Kandrew
Date Posted: 25 Apr 2022 at 10:53am
I agree with post above I don’t spend a lot and I only have one of the burnsco electric sharpener which works fine for me.

I won one of these knives and have used it for a few years, suits me fine.

https://www.marine-deals.co.nz/filleting-knives/rapala-soft-grip-9-fillet-knife-and-sheath" rel="nofollow - https://www.marine-deals.co.nz/filleting-knives/rapala-soft-grip-9-fillet-knife-and-sheath


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 25 Apr 2022 at 11:33am
Yeah it's funny eh, That's a knife I never liked. What suits some people is different for the next guy.

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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 25 Apr 2022 at 1:21pm
Originally posted by kimber7wsm kimber7wsm wrote:

... Knives are a bit like Softbait rods, what one person likes another hates ...

That sums it up rather nicely.


Posted By: Steps
Date Posted: 26 Apr 2022 at 8:37am
Knives , choose the right hardness for the job and then sharpen at the correct angle for that job then correct knife skills.
 Right hardness is usually taken care of by the knife manufactures .. they assume you will be using the corect knife for the correct purpose
 A boning knife doesnt go across a bone, and around a 22 deg
A fish filleting knife, well the drop point area on mine is 22, and the area that goes thru pin bones is around 35 deg .
 A cutthroat razor around 18 deg.
A machete or heavy working knife 35 deg
 Carving knife 22deg, just dont run it across a bone.
The more square the edge the more robust, the finer the edge the faster it looses/breaks the straight burr.
 Stones must be kept milled flat...
 I personally prefer a convex edge rather that a flat edge from a stone.

We have  60s and early 70s carbon steel green rivers, stainless green rivers, victory (all made by Goddard's) Victorex boning knives and skinning knives. Sunday classic sheath knives, a Couple home made from high end $800 knives, numerous 1940s/ 60s gold engraved ivory handle cut throats and leather strops, machetes for garden and filleting big fish.



Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 01 May 2022 at 5:32pm
After reading my plight about losing one of my good knives a (Swibo/Wenger) KevinS realised that was the knife that mysteriously appeared on his boat and he returned it. Thanks Kevin!

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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 01 May 2022 at 10:06pm
Good to hear the Swibo has found its way home Smudge.  Thumbs Up Kevin

What about knife steels / honers.  There are numerous types on the market these days made of different materials including steel, ceramic, diamond etc.  Are some better than others and / or are some suited to SS knives rather than CS?  




Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 02 May 2022 at 12:55pm
I'm not qualified to answer that one Kevin, I use a diamond type sharpener on the boat or for a quick and nasty sharpen on my other knives otherwise I use an oil stone and a smooth steel. I can get my knives pretty sharp but my son does a better job but then he is a butcher. He uses a water stone and a steel. He only works with SS knives

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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Kevin.S
Date Posted: 02 May 2022 at 4:58pm
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

What about knife steels / honers.  There are numerous types on the market these days made of different materials including steel, ceramic, diamond etc.  Are some better than others and / or are some suited to SS knives rather than CS?  

Probably personal choice, but I have a set of diamond hones in different grades that I like.  I use them quite a lot in the workshop too as diamond will put an edge back on most cutting tools, including carbide.  I have found that using a diamond hone to put an edge back on a cutting tool can be better than regrinding an edge as you remove much less material.

My old dad was always keen on having a sharp edge on all his knives, but he was also fond of the grinder and oilstone.  When my brother cleared out his workshop after he died almost every knife he owned was a fraction of it's original size.  There were lots of pocket knives that looked great, but when you opened them up the blade was almost non-existent.


Posted By: The Tamure Kid
Date Posted: 02 May 2022 at 5:16pm
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

Like you smudge I've collected a few knives over the years.  You do go back to the old favourites one of mine being a homemade carbon steel knife I inherited from my father.  I expect it was made by my grandfather.
What is the knife with the orange handle?  My first thoughts were that it was a Swibo but the blade shape doesn't look right.  Fish skinning knife?

One thing to note re the Svords is that they're a 'convex' blade, which requires a different angle to sharpen. If you're like me, that's damn confusing after using a range of standard edged knives.
No matter how often Steps has tried to explain the convex sharpening method, I can't get my head around it - just seem to make the knife more blunt.
If you have good hand sharpening skills, you may like a Svord. The plastic handled ones that the likes of H&F have are not that expensive, it's the wooden handled ones that are more pricey.

I use a Spyderco at the moment to sharpen my standard edged knives, and that goes okay. Though there was a thread a while ago which had a link to a US online review of sharpening systems that wasn't flattering about the Spyderco, versus some others. I think it's fine for a recreational fisho who fillets a few fish at a time. I was on the verge of buying another system, but couldn't justify the spend at the time.

I have some Victory high carbon and also stainless, a US-made Knives of Alaska 'Coho' stainless filleter which is really good, and a US-made Dexter Russell Green River which is high carbon steel (different maker than Steps' Green River, obviously). For choppers, i use some of my grandfather's old carbon steel knives.

I agree with the posts above that individual preferences vary wildly. It seems to depend on how you fillet (ie up and over the ribs versus through the ribs) and the type of fish you most often fillet.


Posted By: Schampy
Date Posted: 02 May 2022 at 7:16pm
Also brought a Knives of Alaska filleting knife for an Xmas present for my son.
Very  very nice... just the right amount of blade curve and flex for dealing to pannie size snapper.
My go-to for years has been a Duel.
But the squared off, grippy handle ,great blade and pin sharp point on the Alaska is far more comfortable if your hands get slippery.
I find myself using it more and more.
Son can go buy his own bloody knife.


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 02 May 2022 at 8:39pm
Great feedback guys

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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: The Tamure Kid
Date Posted: 02 May 2022 at 9:24pm
Originally posted by kimber7wsm kimber7wsm wrote:

Personally, I never had much luck with the victory knives. Don't like them at all.

Knives are a bit like Softbait rods, what one person likes another hates.

I used to use a Victorinox Curved boning knife as I like a stiffer blade. It was a bit short on the bigger snapper.

I did get a Duel filleting knife (another NZ brand) through a deal at Marine-deals. I really like it for a flexible filleting knife. Holds an edge really well, easy to sharpen. The handle is really good, even when greasy. I find it much better than the victory range. It is the DK4B. I really like the look of the DK9, so might get one of those.

Very interesting, re the Duel. The DK9 looks similar to the Swiss-made Swibo curved filleter which is the same price at Top-gear. Do you know are they still made in NZ (they appear to be Whangarei-based) or shifted manufacturing of NZ-designed knives overseas?

is the difference between the B or the plain numbers the handle - acrylic v rubber - ie no difference in the blade materials?

I do find the Marine Deals 'why pay..' stuff a bit amusing. I can't see any shops with the B models at the top price they list. But to be fair, M Deals' sale price is still much lower than other retailers' full price.


Posted By: kimber7wsm
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 6:43am
Good question TTK.

We brought a duel kitchen knife years ago for the Mother in law, and it was custom made. I assumed that they were all still NZ made. After your question I tried googling duel knives and it took me to a different website in Whangarei. I don't know what the story is.

It appears that the B denotes acrylic handle. I made a mistake with the model I gave when I looked it up on M-D the picture was the rubber handle version. It looks more like I've got the DK1. The rubber handle is really really good when your hands get greasy, offers huge amounts of grip, and fits my hand very well.

The DK9 turned up, but I haven't had a chance to use it. It's much stiffer than the DK1, which I like on bigger fish.

As mentioned I do like the blade for very good edge keeping capabilities, yet good to sharpen.

I agree about M-D, I don't really bother with them now. I find Smartmarine good. M-D do tend to keep a larger range of stock though.




Posted By: The Tamure Kid
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 8:45am
Originally posted by kimber7wsm kimber7wsm wrote:

Good question TTK.

We brought a duel kitchen knife years ago for the Mother in law, and it was custom made. I assumed that they were all still NZ made. After your question I tried googling duel knives and it took me to a different website in Whangarei. I don't know what the story is.




Yes, the links go to Saltwater Connection, which is a great fishing/diving shop in Whangarei. Doesn't mean the Duels are not made in a factory somewhere in NZ, but it made me curious...
Victory, for example, has a factory in Mt Wellington and you can (or could last time I went there) buy with cash at the shop out the front of it.

While I have some overseas-made knives, I like to support local manufacturers if choosing between very similar products - given these economic times.


Posted By: Steps
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 9:51am
As smudge knows , I have been around knives, and quite a collection, from old gold inlaid cut throats to machetes for 60 odd yrs.
Couple things about 'best knife ' stuff
 Regardless of brand / steel etc the by far the biggest fault of a knife is the users knife skills.. be it fishing boning , or caving the sunday roast. Just yesterday, filleting bin fish, a young guy why his " grappy edge victory" goes blunt, and why my victory went thru 15 big snaps and still had its edge.
2nd is how sharpened... like a chain saw, cut hard purirri or manuka a steep 30/35 deg , pine 25 deg. use a 25 on the hard wood and the edge breaks off real fast. The drop point end where the slicing flesh is 22/25 deg never run it across a bone or hard surface.. eg cut a pizza on a plate. The main blade above the hilt, where crash thru a few pin bones etc.. 33/35 deg
 And never wipe the chopping board sideways to clear a few scales whatever.
 And care.. When finished, re hone, and I give a light spray of canola oil from a aerosol. The slightest but invisible rust on the fine edge kills it before even using the blade.

I prefer convex edge for long lasting and hard work. Has a far greater robustness and fine cutting burr than a flat worked edge.

Next is the comfort to suit ones hand shape and size. A comfortable grip improves good  knife skills.

In the kitchen is a drop point late 60s green river and late 60s green river caving knife. A high carbon stainless green river chef knife and similar  victory. And a victory boning knife.

 In the shed (leaving out the display german NCO dress bayonets, old sheath knives, german ivory handle gold inlaid cut throats etc.
 The working knives are 12 " machete (big fish) 25" (?) gardening. Got to for fish victory high carbon stainless, larger green river cabbage. Victorex boning , a flex green river filleting "( mainly used as a guest knife, I dont like the flex.)

And the boat, pams $5 stainless , a burnsco and some other stray  for bait knives.. These are still very sharp at the end of a day. And a longer Wiltshire (2nd hand shop) very sharp stainless caving knife.  They do the job as good as any expensive and or fancy knife with out exposing my good knives to crap marine environment.

Oh and sundry other knives like a silver bladed (yes soft silver alloy) pen knife used for when tobacco pipes where in fashion 100 or so yrs ago.


Posted By: Alan L
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 12:30pm
I won't show/share any of my knives with you guys.
I struggle to get anything sharp for long. I use whatever is sharp enough to fillet the fish. When that one is done I round them all up and sharpen enough til I have some sharp enough for fish - til next time.
Now off to do some gurnard - with my last knife that seems to work.
Alan


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Legasea Legend member


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 3:56pm
I look forward to the day when I have a fish big enough to justify some of my knives. Big smile

A lot of personal preference when it comes to knives, mine aren't anything flash but I'm a little spoilt for choice. They are nice to have


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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 4:15pm
HaHa " Smudge" read that your son is a butcher.My Nephew is one as well and all I can say is.Bring your own knife as his never get the attention they requireLOL

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Amateur's built the ark. Professional built the Titanic


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 4:26pm
Originally posted by Pcj Pcj wrote:

HaHa " Smudge" read that your son is a butcher.My Nephew is one as well and all I can say is.Bring your own knife as his never get the attention they requireLOL

Scotty (my son, not Skoti my mate) can sharpen them alright. Certainly better than me but I am very much DIY


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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 5:31pm
Originally posted by smudge smudge wrote:

Originally posted by Pcj Pcj wrote:

HaHa " Smudge" read that your son is a butcher.My Nephew is one as well and all I can say is.Bring your own knife as his never get the attention they requireLOL

Scotty (my son, not Skoti my mate) can sharpen them alright. Certainly better than me but I am very much DIY
Should of Added his butchery Knives are good,but bait knives Hmm

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Amateur's built the ark. Professional built the Titanic


Posted By: Tonto2
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 6:23pm
Thanks for the input guys. I have ordered a swibo but in the meantime have learnt that I already had a pretty good knife I just needed to sort out the sharpening skills😳. Bought a diamond steel thingy and has made all the difference. Cheers.

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slowly going where everyone else has already been


Posted By: Schampy
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 6:33pm
Absolutely love knives. Have a Buck Knife collection proudly displayed on wall of our kitchen.... which her indoors isn't exactly doing backflips about.... but its only a few compared to what I have.
Have given up buying nice knives for spear fishing. They are simply too easy to lose. The cheap little $7.00 numbers are ok and good enough to iki a fish and gut it while in the water... but they are cheap for a reason. Have snapped 3 so far....The last one broke off under a bloody Paua of all things.
Im not superstitious but I always scuba dive with a small titainium  knife clipped up on my shoulder....iv had it for decades. Its like a good luck charm. I check that that's there before I check my air. 
.....Like I said. Not superstitious at all.....


Posted By: Alan L
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 7:25pm
Originally posted by Schampy Schampy wrote:

Have snapped 3 so far....The last one broke off under a bloody Paua of all things.
Im not superstitious but I always scuba dive with a small titainium  knife clipped up on my shoulder....iv had it for decades. Its like a good luck charm. I check that that's there before I check my air. 
.....Like I said. Not superstitious at all.....
So last time I dived this summer I lost my knife I have on my leg. Had it for so long. Never had to use it, but a good strong sharp knife. Clipped the duckboard as I climbed out, split the plastic sheath and wobbled down to the bottom.  it was a bad day, but no way to get it back. Feel like I am missing a friend.
Alan


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Legasea Legend member


Posted By: smudge
Date Posted: 03 May 2022 at 9:11pm
Originally posted by Schampy Schampy wrote:

Im not superstitious but I always scuba dive with a small titainium  knife clipped up on my shoulder....iv had it for decades. Its like a good luck charm. I check that that's there before I check my air. 
.....Like I said. Not superstitious at all.....

Of course you aren't superstitious! It's a knife!



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Best gurnard fisherman in my street


Posted By: kimber7wsm
Date Posted: 04 May 2022 at 9:09am
The most important part to sharpening, is maintaining consistency of angle. Do that and you go along way to having a sharp edge.

Hard steels require fine grit, soft steels coarser grit finishing with a finer grit.


Posted By: Derek F
Date Posted: 07 May 2022 at 11:16am
Not a black and white subject at all.  I think first thing is to find knives that are the shape and flexibility the suits you and your filleting and then think about your sharpening method and how good you are at it.
If you are learning or using any of the pull through systems you may as well buy a softer and a cheaper knife.
(also some of the softer (surgical) steels more rust resistant than others)
A fair amount of people I sharpen for really appreciate sharp knives and get fussier and fussier about their knives so gradually get good with steels (and develop muscle memory) or buy stones or other things. At this point they look after knives better as well and get more value out of quality and expensive knives. 



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And the trouble is, if you don't risk anything, you risk even more...Erica Jong


Posted By: bazza
Date Posted: 08 May 2022 at 7:29pm

Can vouch for the fact that Derek REALLY knows what he is talking about when it comes to knife sharpening !
 



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When you cry, feel pain or sadness, no one notices your sorrow .... BUT
fart just ONE time !!!!!!!!!!!


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 20 May 2022 at 10:04pm
I have a hankering for nostalgia.  Has anyone reshaped and sharpened one of the old fashioned bone handled table knives as a fillet knife?  Most that I've seen are SS and were manufactured in Sheffield England.  The blades generally have a bit of flex which I like but have no idea whether they would keep an edge as a filleting style cutting knife.  Hardness of the steel could be an issue?


Posted By: slayliner
Date Posted: 21 May 2022 at 8:30am
Best you save those as scallop knives


Posted By: Steps
Date Posted: 21 May 2022 at 9:08am
So lonng post as adding the hows and the whys.
 You can slowly reshape on a stone by hand with take lot work..

Re shaping of a knife quicker, if want it to maintain and edge, stainless or other wise requires several steps.
The moment you put a grinder or sanding disk on you create heat on the edge. This heat takes out any annealing.. hardness of the steel edge.
Then once the shaped has been established and a reasonable edge, the blade gets heated till red hot and checked with a magnet till it is no longer magnetic is a good indicator. Then dunked quickly in a container of oil to quench till back to room temp.
This now becomes very hard and brittle, hard to put a edge on and if used as a lever will snap very easy.
 The next step is to put in an over for few hrs at anything from around 200 to 400 deg.. depending on the alloy and how flexable and harden you want the edge...
Generally the less flexible the longer a hard working edge will be maintained.

These processes are done before the handles are attached...for obvious reasons.

Keep in mind professional butchers, fish mongers use stiffer boning / filleting knives as they keep the edge better and longer.

 Hope this helps your understanding as to what you are intending to do.


Posted By: Schampy
Date Posted: 21 May 2022 at 11:02am
Originally posted by slayliner slayliner wrote:

Best you save those as scallop knives

Hmmmm ... might be  few years before any scallop knife sees any action these days due to Rahuis.
Will be interesting to see in years to come if they ever get lifted.


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 21 May 2022 at 11:09am
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

I have a hankering for nostalgia.  Has anyone reshaped and sharpened one of the old fashioned bone handled table knives as a fillet knife?  Most that I've seen are SS and were manufactured in Sheffield England.  The blades generally have a bit of flex which I like but have no idea whether they would keep an edge as a filleting style cutting knife.  Hardness of the steel could be an issue?
Steel knives(carbon) hold their edge better. Young fella recently brought a set of Japanese Steel knives(antiques)And took them to a guy in Glen Innes where he professionally sharpened them,uses them for his sushi or thinly slicing meats. Do not wash,just wipe clean,definatly no dish washer as edge will go.Oil with vege oil occasionally. Over 100yrs old and good as the day made. Do not try to sharpen bring them  ,in 6 months and I will give them another run.
He has the knife(carving set)from the old set  shefield set of mine must go pick it up.The box thats lined with forks/spoons etc


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Amateur's built the ark. Professional built the Titanic


Posted By: e.m.p!
Date Posted: 21 May 2022 at 2:57pm
I'm after an opinion - Recently bought myself a bit of a meatier blade for those bigger fish, but the knife has a standard factory edge. Was wondering if anyone uses a convex edge for filleting? Happy to sand down if worth the effort


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 21 May 2022 at 6:03pm
My query about sharpening / reshaping old knives was triggered by the pic below.  This collection will be auctioned in about a week's time.  There are some interesting shaped knives amongst them and some would not require reshaping.  I'll check them out next week I think.  Estimated auction selling price is given as $100 but I'm picking that could well be low.





Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 21 May 2022 at 6:05pm
Originally posted by Fish Addict Fish Addict wrote:

My query about sharpening / reshaping old knives was triggered by the pic below.  This collection will be auctioned in about a week's time.  There are some interesting shaped knives amongst them and some would not require reshaping.  I'll check them out next week I think.  Estimated auction selling price is given as $100 but I'm picking that could well be low.



not sure on Aussie prices but nz be $200 start

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Amateur's built the ark. Professional built the Titanic


Posted By: kimber7wsm
Date Posted: 22 May 2022 at 5:56am
Not wanting to sound rude, but that $100 or more could easily buy one or two knives that are already exactly what you want. With good rubber handles, that fit your hand well.

However, if you want a project that soaks up some hours, go for it.

Keep in mind bone handled knives get really slippery, very quickly. That sort of thing sticks in you mind when you've slipped just the once and becomes a very important consideration. Ask me how I know. Ouch.


Posted By: Steps
Date Posted: 22 May 2022 at 9:27am
Keep in mind bone handled knives get really slippery, very quickly.

 Yeah.. ok for the table and carving the sunday roast.. get into breaking down a animal or fish, or cutting up a shoulder to mice or casserole 
 I think you may find couple of those knives maybe the old ivory???
 The carving forks caught my eye.. wondering if they still has the flip up bit on the back...

 Think you may also find that other than maybe a couple, none of those knife steel alloys are designed to hold lasting working edges..


Posted By: Fish Addict
Date Posted: 26 May 2022 at 6:58pm
Originally posted by Steps Steps wrote:

... The carving forks caught my eye.. wondering if they still has the flip up bit on the back...

They sure do.
I checked them out today.  There are a few knives that could be of interest although I acknowledge my proposed use is not what the manufacturer would have envisaged.  Longish blade carving knives could become skinning knives.  Steel quality ....... no idea?  The cleaver is very solid, made in Germany, Ox Head I think was the brand.  Online auction ends this Sunday.
 
kimber7wsm - I already have more knives than I need, some quality, some cheapies and others hand made by my grandfather who worked for the NZ Railways making replacement parts for their locos.  I think it would be fair to say I'm a bit of a collector of things of interest which just happens to include fishing gear and accessories.


Posted By: kimber7wsm
Date Posted: 27 May 2022 at 5:33am
Absolutely fair enough.


Posted By: Steps
Date Posted: 27 May 2022 at 9:17am
An old bone ivory flip on the back,as display, anyone who is in the 'know' will appreciate it. The come out to cave for a special occasion..
Find on with the flip up still there has been very rare for long time now.

Side note on them thu.. never understood  why they where around back in the day... Back then most ppl had more than basic knife skills so why carve back towards ones self. These days makes sense most ppl no longer have these basic skills ????

 Longish blade carving knives could become skinning knives.  Steel quality ....... no idea?

yeah a big wide snapper, whatever fillet and the filleting knife a little short, pain in the butt...
Now if just using for skinning, as I have said before , the right blade steel for the right job, drop a 30/33 deg edge preferably convex, and it will go thru skinning a bin of good west coast snaps nps. But use it for much more and will not be long before the steel comes out and maybe the stone later.

The cleaver is very solid, made in Germany, Ox Head I think was the brand.

I love a good cleaver, got couple up on my display board, a carbon steel in the kitchen...both around the 35 deg concave edge and can do anything from carve to split a carcass spine.
Watch asians use cleavers, way under rated in western society. I grew up close to a Chinese family, always fascinated and envied their cleaver skills... and try as much as I did/ do never got the hang of it.



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