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Buying a new trailer - brands? Alloy or galv?

Printed From: The Fishing Website
Category: General Forums
Forum Name: The Boat Shed
Forum Description: Discuss all things boating.
URL: https://www.fishing.net.nz/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=125866
Printed Date: 18 Jun 2024 at 8:00am


Topic: Buying a new trailer - brands? Alloy or galv?
Posted By: fritzhu
Subject: Buying a new trailer - brands? Alloy or galv?
Date Posted: 14 Oct 2017 at 10:02pm
Well, unfortunately I find myself in need of a replacement boat trailer - my 20-year-old Hoskings 6.7 is rusted right out, from the inside out! :( Given that everything else on the trailer is also on the way out, it's time to replace it I suspect.

So, I have been looking at options, because unfortunately I can't afford the $8800+GST for a replacement Hoskings!

I'm hoping people here would have had some experience with these. Please do chime in!

Some stats on the current trailer: 100x50x5mm frame, 63x32mm crossbars, 90x90x5mm drawbar. Tandem braked, Duratorque suspension at 1500kg a pair (so, what, 2250kg all up?), Tyres are 165x13 8-ply but need to be at 50psi to look okay... Coupling is rated 2500kg. Total of 40 wobble rollers, no keel rollers.

http://spitfirealuminiumtrailers.co.nz/product/7.50-metre-dual-axle-2000kg%20braked-dual-axle-multi-roller-boat-trailer" rel="nofollow - Spitfire alloy trailer
12-month warranty, 24-month warranty on chassis
This one is the alloy option in the list - but the GVM is 300kg less than my current trailer.

http://performancetrailers.co.nz/performance-boat-trailer-pbt211/" rel="nofollow - Performance Trailers PBT211
12-month warranty
This one is my favorite so far because of the generous number of rollers (including keel) but it may be too long for the driveway.

https://xpresstrailers.co.nz/boat-trailers/tandem-axle-boat-trailers/21-22ft-ax740t/" rel="nofollow - Xpress AX740T
5-year warranty, same as Hoskings.
I like this one because the frame is 120x60x5mm.

http://ultratrailers.co.nz/trailer/tandem-boat-22-24-ft-heavy-duty/" rel="nofollow - Ultra Trailers 22 to 24ft Heavy Duty
Warranty not specified.
I like this one again because of the frame being 120x60x5.

http://reidtrailers.co.nz/store/boat-trailers/multi-roller-6-8-7m/" rel="nofollow - Reid Trailers Multi Roller 6.5-7m
Warranty not specified.
Seems like a good option but could be ruled out yet as price is not shown.



Replies:
Posted By: jackel
Date Posted: 14 Oct 2017 at 10:45pm
Only advice is watch out for the trailers made from ultra cheap steel. The five year warranty looks attractive on the Xpress. 


Posted By: edge01
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2017 at 10:43am
The cheapest way is to go 2nd hand if you can find one in good condition. Otherwise you can always get a new frame made and swap all of your running gear over. Re galv everything and reassemble. I would go to Springs over duro tořques. Easier and cheaper to replace


Posted By: Schampy
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2017 at 11:08am
Had an xpress tandem trailer a few years ago. The price was a hell of a lot less than a NZ made trailer. It seemed solid and well built, I had no problems with it. In due course I sold the boat to a person down in Wellington. (Im In Auckland) I recieved an Email once he towed the boat home stating the breaks - hydrulic disc, were completely stuffed.
I told the owner to get in touch with xpress as it should of been sorted under warranty. Its the old saying.... you get what you pay for. The breaks were not top of the line and the price reflected that. Yes they should of survived a trip to wellington though.
There seem to be a few of them around and I think they are a good option for an older boat.... or in my case a home build where a $10000 trailer would over capitalize the boat. Just probaly need to keep a closer eye on areas that potentially cause isses. 



Posted By: MacSkipper
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2017 at 11:31am
I have owned hoskings and some other trailers and rate them pretty good by comparison and 20 years is damn good! I hear you about price but sometimes you have to bite bullet.  Sure another brand may be cheaper but will it fit boat properly as well?  How long are you intending to keep boat - if more than 5 years probably better to get another hoskings trailer as original lasted pretty well?  Also consider resale in a few years as value of boat will depend on condition of trailer then as well.  A well built aluminium trailer will cost more but may last longer if really thinking long term?

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Good fishing trip nothing breaks, great trip catch fish.


Posted By: fritzhu
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2017 at 2:06pm
Thanks guys :-) My other option is to buy a replacement frame from Hoskings - I can't remember the price but it's something like $2800. The only catch is, they don't make them for duratorques anymore so I would have to DIY the suspension (maybe $1k or so if I reuse the brakes, which are brand new), which I've done before...


Posted By: fritzhu
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2017 at 2:09pm
The other thought is about the spitfire alloy trailer - they claim to be made in NZ, from the photos that looks to be the case. It's about $1000 over the price of a galv trailer.


Posted By: fritzhu
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2017 at 2:14pm
Originally posted by Schampy Schampy wrote:

Had an xpress tandem trailer a few years ago. The price was a hell of a lot less than a NZ made trailer. It seemed solid and well built, I had no problems with it. In due course I sold the boat to a person down in Wellington. (Im In Auckland) I recieved an Email once he towed the boat home stating the breaks - hydrulic disc, were completely stuffed.
I told the owner to get in touch with xpress as it should of been sorted under warranty. Its the old saying.... you get what you pay for. The breaks were not top of the line and the price reflected that. Yes they should of survived a trip to wellington though.
There seem to be a few of them around and I think they are a good option for an older boat.... or in my case a home build where a $10000 trailer would over capitalize the boat. Just probaly need to keep a closer eye on areas that potentially cause isses. 



Thanks mate - that's some awesome feedback right there. I wonder if an Xpress would be okay if I swapped my current brakes over?


Posted By: Schampy
Date Posted: 15 Oct 2017 at 8:58pm
Cant see why not. If my memory serves me right it was the thick end of 2k to upgrade to ss discs etc. Definitely worth asking.


Posted By: MikeAqua
Date Posted: 16 Oct 2017 at 9:39am
As others have said, you get what you pay for.  The first Hosking trailer for my boat lasted for over 25 years and I still got good money (hotly contested trade-me auction) when I sold it.

When I replaced it with a new Hosking trailer they still had the 1987 patterns/plans for the boat.

I think a new Hosking frame would be the way to go.  ?They may be able to accommodate your dura-torques?

Otherwise can your brake and hub assemblies be fitted onto stubs axles with springs?  The springs and stubs are reasonably cheap.


Posted By: fritzhu
Date Posted: 16 Oct 2017 at 5:04pm
Okay, I think I have an answer... not sure...

So, we towed the trailer down to Hoskings this morning, and I was told a couple of things:
1. The trailer really is buggered;
2. A replacement frame, with me DIY'ing everything else, would be $3500
3. A new trailer would be just under $8500+gst ($9500 or so inc)

However, I was also told by the fellow at Hoskings that the galvanising on the modern trailers is not as good as it was back in 1997, and it was only likely to last between 12 and 15 years.

So, the options are:

1. Have the holes patched - not feasible because the entire side of the frame is shot, and no warranty or guarantee.

2. Buy a whole new Hosking trailer for $9500 and sell the old one; assuming it gets $1k, this sets me back $8500. Unsure of warranty as I didn't ask; I'd expect 5 years? 

3. Buy a replacement frame and DIY swap everything over from the old trailer - everything I need to build it up comes to $5403, which includes the new Hosking frame. Warranty would be tricky, I presume.

4. Buy a new trailer from Xpress and sell my trailer - if it goes for $1k as most people seem to think it would, this would cost me a total of $5400, and I get a 5-year warranty and a trailer that would hopefully last at least 10 years.

I'm starting to lean towards #4, especially after what the fellow said today re galvanising...


Posted By: Schampy
Date Posted: 16 Oct 2017 at 7:48pm
Yep its easy to sit here and recommend NZ built brands etc. We not the ones having to shell out the hard earned $$$.  Seen plenty of Surtees trailers looking pretty rough after way less than 10 years....
Its a tricky one..... I told myself I wouldnt get an express again after what happened to the breaks on mine ....(that could of seriously got messy if new boat owner was in an emergency stopping situation) 
But if you are going to alleviate that problem buy fitting your own discs/calipers etc then you are at least minimizing potential issues.
5k for a 25 ft Tandem with a 5 year warrenty. Cheap mate.
I would pay to have the winch upgraded to an AL-KO while you were at it. Never been 100% with those open style winchs..... Americans seem to love em though...  Maybe its just me....


Posted By: Gappy
Date Posted: 16 Oct 2017 at 9:12pm
What type of boat i have a friend with a near new glav tandem for sale had a 7m alloy boat on it hes gone to an alloy trailer.

It has keel rollers and skids on it.

He wants 5k for it locally built and built strong.


Posted By: MikeAqua
Date Posted: 17 Oct 2017 at 8:08am
Originally posted by Schampy Schampy wrote:

Yep its easy to sit here and recommend NZ built brands etc. We not the ones having to shell out the hard earned $$$. 


I'm recommending after having recently shelled out the $$$.  Worth every cent.

If a customer did encounter issues, I have a high level of confidence Hosking will stand behind their product.

As I said, they built my trailer using patterns from 1987 when the boat was built.  The wobble rollers weren't quite the right width for the boat's chine spacing.

After a phone call and an email with some measurements, Hosking supplied new, slightly wider wobble roller frames.  They didn't charge me, just asked me to send the old frames back.


Posted By: pompey
Date Posted: 17 Oct 2017 at 11:18am
Originally posted by MikeAqua MikeAqua wrote:

[QUOTE=Schampy]Yep its easy to sit here and recommend NZ built brands etc. We not the ones having to shell out the hard earned $$$. 


I'm recommending after having recently shelled out the $$$.  Worth every cent.

If a customer did encounter issues, I have a high level of confidence Hosking will stand behind their product.

As I said, they built my trailer using patterns from 1987 when the boat was built.  The wobble rollers weren't quite the right width for the boat's chine spacing.

After a phone call and an email with some measurements, Hosking supplied new, slightly wider wobble roller frames.  They didn't charge me, just asked me to send the old frames back.

I agree, I have had these guys build me a trailer and they are very reliable and customer focused and they stand by their trailers. If you are going to keep you boat for a few years, I think it is well worth to spend the extra couple of grand and have a quality trailer backed by the manufacturer. If you compared the trailers side by side you would notice the difference in quality I'm sure.


Posted By: fritzhu
Date Posted: 17 Oct 2017 at 11:41am
I should probably mention that I only have around $6.5k to spend - if I had 9, I would be going with the Hosking hands down :) not necessarily because of the quality (Xpress seem pretty good too, I visited their shop in Warkworth today and they do build them there on-site and have them galv'd in Hamilton) but because of everything I've heard about their customer service. They really just seem a cut above the rest.


Posted By: fritzhu
Date Posted: 17 Oct 2017 at 11:43am
Originally posted by Schampy Schampy wrote:

Yep its easy to sit here and recommend NZ built brands etc. We not the ones having to shell out the hard earned $$$.  Seen plenty of Surtees trailers looking pretty rough after way less than 10 years....
Its a tricky one..... I told myself I wouldnt get an express again after what happened to the breaks on mine ....(that could of seriously got messy if new boat owner was in an emergency stopping situation) 
But if you are going to alleviate that problem buy fitting your own discs/calipers etc then you are at least minimizing potential issues.
5k for a 25 ft Tandem with a 5 year warrenty. Cheap mate.
I would pay to have the winch upgraded to an AL-KO while you were at it. Never been 100% with those open style winchs..... Americans seem to love em though...  Maybe its just me....


That does sound like a good plan. Wonder if I can upgrade the winch, then use the old one to build some sort of an axle lift system for maneuvering it in the driveway ...


Posted By: MATTOO
Date Posted: 17 Oct 2017 at 9:03pm
I'll make an offer of opinions.

Cm trailers make ok gear in alloy, and there back up,service is excellent.

If you chase second hand gear, I do have some 1759 kg axles with durotorque suspension 10 years old that have plenty of life that I will happily sell at a good price.

Your call.

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Just cruising in my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!


Posted By: out2sea
Date Posted: 01 Feb 2024 at 2:58pm
Resurrecting an old thread. I'm in the same situation as the original poster. I have a 20 year old trailer that I suspect is beyond economical and safe repair.

The question is; What has changed other than prices since 2017 in regards to galv. vs Alloy? 

Trailer is for a 6.5m Rayglass 2150. So sitting on its original Hoskings trailer. 

The $8800 quote for a new Hoskings by OP is looking incredibly good now, thanks inflation..

Current Approx. Prices:

Galv. $13k base + $750 for SS rotor upgrade for NZ made. Waiting on other quotes.

Alloy: Spitfire: $13.5k Any Experience? I don't see to many around in NZ 
         Ally Trailers: $18.5k 

Given its unlikely a new Galv trailer will last 20 years again given the quality of galvanising has dropped is the additional cost of alloy worth it? 


Posted By: MB
Date Posted: 01 Feb 2024 at 3:04pm
I can't answer your question, but I would be interested to know how much of a wash down people give their alloy trailers after a trip. Although I'm fastidious with the wash down of my galvanised trailer, it's a job that I particularly hate doing for some reason! 


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 01 Feb 2024 at 5:16pm
Originally posted by out2sea out2sea wrote:

Resurrecting an old thread. I'm in the same situation as the original poster. I have a 20 year old trailer that I suspect is beyond economical and safe repair.

The question is; What has changed other than prices since 2017 in regards to galv. vs Alloy? 

Trailer is for a 6.5m Rayglass 2150. So sitting on its original Hoskings trailer. 

The $8800 quote for a new Hoskings by OP is looking incredibly good now, thanks inflation..

Current Approx. Prices:

Galv. $13k base + $750 for SS rotor upgrade for NZ made. Waiting on other quotes.

Alloy: Spitfire: $13.5k Any Experience? I don't see to many around in NZ 
         Ally Trailers: $18.5k 

Given its unlikely a new Galv trailer will last 20 years again given the quality of galvanising has dropped is the additional cost of alloy worth it? 
I got best trailer last yr and for price nothing really compares,ring in the morning and was ready by afternoon. Everything is adjustable.              https://besttrailers.co.nz/product/105/bst680dr-suits-20-21ft-boats/" rel="nofollow - https://besttrailers.co.nz/product/105/bst680dr-suits-20-21ft-boats/

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"Times up"


Posted By: krow
Date Posted: 01 Feb 2024 at 8:35pm
My son has a normal 8x4 trailer from Best and It's dam good, very well made and Galv is still good. Not in the salt but I've seen a Best boat trailer up here and it was made very well and had more wobble rollers than the equivalent. Also Galv was in mint condition. 


Posted By: letsgetem
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 8:29am
I have a 4 year old Figlass trailer, and the galvanising is badly corroding. Obviously the galv standard is terrible. It goes in the sea. Incidentally, I complained to Figlass, and they werent interested. Also - I made a warranty claim for something else, and Figlass has just ignored it. ie 3 communications through the retailer and no reply!! Hows that for terrible service. Pity as otherwise their boats are good.

Best trailers - I would be interested in hearing about the galvanising standard on a trailer that goes in the sea?


Posted By: Bounty Hunter
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 9:15am
couple of things you could do to increase the longevity of the galv trailer frame.

request a double dip/ 600-weight galv during manufacturing - get the cert as proof

request drain holes every 1500mm in the frame - use rubber bungs to plug the holes and wash it internally regularly - and then remove plugs annually and internally spray with cavity wax type product

the other question to ask - how long do you think youll keep the boat - if a trailer lasts 10 or 20years - does it matter if youre likely to sell in 5?


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No disintegrations!


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 10:12am
Best trailers are bolted together.little welding.channeks are open .no end caps.pkenty drains holes to flush out.With my set up.I have to put a rope around winch post too slow boat down or hold winch handles as boat just slides off.Retrieval lights just touch water and winch on.dint have to submerge to axles.bearinf buddies fitted and I grease/check 3 monthly.no sign of rust in 12 months but springs could do with a spray..4k v 6.5k get what you pay for but no waiting on stock

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"Times up"


Posted By: lawabidingpoacher
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 3:51pm
Any galvanising is only an anode . It's there to deteriorate before the steel . Once you can see deterioration or any rust etc , it's time to blast and redo. The last trailer I built I painted with a two pot paint . 10 years later and it's probably no worse than galve ....my 2 cents worth !


Posted By: out2sea
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 7:57pm
It does make me wonder why more galv trailers aren't made with U section or I section steel to stop the salt water pooling inside.

All box section trailers I have seen have rusted from the inside out which is certainly the case with mine. It makes me think the previous owner never flushed it. It has always been a part of the boats wash down for me.

I see some manufacturers offer flushing ports as standard now but it doesn't seem to do the cross members well.

Alternatively the spitfire trailer is anodised and hardened aluminium which is bolted together so no welds to crack and looks to be I section so easy to rinse and nowhere for salt to build up.


Posted By: lawabidingpoacher
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 8:16pm
In the past with box section, I have after completely sealing off , drilled 10mm holes and partially filled with waste oil , the spot welded a plug back in. None have ever come back to me


Posted By: MB
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 8:41pm
Have to say my Voyager trailer is a bit basic, but all the internals can be flushed out fairly easily. I'm no engineer, but I wonder why trailers aren't made with sealed box sections? 


Posted By: krow
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 8:56pm
Originally posted by MB MB wrote:

Have to say my Voyager trailer is a bit basic, but all the internals can be flushed out fairly easily. I'm no engineer, but I wonder why trailers aren't made with sealed box sections? 
Can't hot dip if sealed. Could explode blasting hot molten Galv everywhere. 
Also without a proper pressure test and positive pressure all the time water may get in and not be able to get out. 
I really doubt being supper pedantic with wash down at home extends the life by much. A fair bit of the salt buildup is while it's parked at the ramp and unlikely to be able to remove the semi dried salt from the internals. 


Posted By: Pcj
Date Posted: 02 Feb 2024 at 11:07pm
Originally posted by krow krow wrote:

Originally posted by MB MB wrote:

Have to say my Voyager trailer is a bit basic, but all the internals can be flushed out fairly easily. I'm no engineer, but I wonder why trailers aren't made with sealed box sections? 
Can't hot dip if sealed. Could explode blasting hot molten Galv everywhere. 
Also without a proper pressure test and positive pressure all the time water may get in and not be able to get out. 
I really doubt being supper pedantic with wash down at home extends the life by much. A fair bit of the salt buildup is while it's parked at the ramp and unlikely to be able to remove the semi dried salt from the internals. 
Just like flushing motor,1/2hr trip home.The hot motor cooling on way home,doubt on flushing all salt is removed,same for trailers/brakes.Sitting at park bay while fishing,damage occurring?

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"Times up"


Posted By: MB
Date Posted: 03 Feb 2024 at 8:08am
Thanks Krow, I thought there might be a reason for it. 

I get that most damage is probably done after launching the boat. There's a guy at my OBC who flushes his trailer after launching. That's a step too far even for me. I want to get fishing!


Posted By: DIY
Date Posted: 03 Feb 2024 at 4:41pm
I have a galv trailer made of ‘C’ section and after nearly 5 years it’s looking good, just some rust on nuts and bolts etc. it gets used a lot and I’m not too fussy when it comes to washing down. The axle is box and I can’t really get much water into the holes to flush it out. I figured if I need to replace the axle eventually, I can live with that.

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Oh what a smasher - two eggs and a rasher!



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