FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

My first Tongariro trip since lock down (May 2020)

Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Jofly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: My first Tongariro trip since lock down (May 2020)
    Posted: 26 May 2020 at 12:44pm
Jofly View Drop Down
Gold
Gold
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 767
The Tongariro was a tad low and clear but the fish were still there and I thought they were good condition and size. I  managed to catch a few from the Major Jones and lower river (Grace road) in a nice morning session.  Keen to see what this week's rain will bring. Below is the video from the trip. Enjoy.


Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fraser Hocks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 2020 at 9:01am
Fraser Hocks View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum


Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Location: Queenstown
Status: Offline
Points: 1304
Nice one Johan.   Sorry mate, I only just spotted this video.   

Funnily enough a bunch of us from the local fishing club are heading up to Turangi for the end of July.   Should be a great trip.  Good to see the fishery firing again!!!
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Bigfishbob Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 2020 at 9:59am
Bigfishbob View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum


Joined: 19 Aug 2004
Location: Hamilton
Status: Offline
Points: 2803
Yeah we were there last Saturday too, Low and Clear but the fish were there if you moved around.
www.waikatosportfishing.co.nz
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fishb8 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jun 2020 at 7:16am
Fishb8 View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium
Avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2002
Location: Hamilton
Status: Offline
Points: 8826
What weight rods/lines does everyone use on Tongariro and TT?
Haven't fished at Taupo since 2006 and only used a 4 wt rod on smaller streams ever since.
Feel it's time I should revisit Taupo again.
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jun 2020 at 9:39am
The Tamure Kid View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 25 Aug 2015
Location: Auckland
Status: Offline
Points: 3543
I grew up fishing down there using 8 Wt for nymphing, and used that on my trips last year as it was what I had.

But in discussions on this forum after that trip, the modern trend is to use 6 wt on the Tongariro - mainly in response to the smaller average size of the fish, but also probably in reaction to using smaller indicators than in the old days, and advancements in rod technology.

I don't see that the nymphs have got any lighter, with a lot of people using double tungsten beads on the top fly, and single beadheads on the bottom, or weighted nymphs plus splitshot (combined, must weigh a tonne) but there you go.

In days gone by I found that learning to cast at the right angle and mend correctly was more effective for me and more enjoyable than adding more and more weight - which is downright dangerous in a strong wind that often blows up down there in sunny conditions (if you haven't learned Herb's roll cast!!). 

Part of the problem is that when conditions are crowded as they are now with the resurgence of the fishery and more people having time on their hands, unless you really time your cast to align with the person above you (who often let their lines drag well downstream), you often can't cast upstream enough for lighter nymphs to have sunk to the right depth in the right zone, so people compensate by using very heavy rigs. 

Funnily enough, the last trip I did all my fish were hooked from lies that were pretty close to where I was standing - didn't need to cast far and a 6 wt would have been fine. 

Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Jofly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jun 2020 at 9:38am
Jofly View Drop Down
Gold
Gold
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 767
I started with an 8wt years ago and recently have also moved to a 6wt.  The newer rods easily handle even double tungsten nymphs on 12-ft + leaders.  Just like TTK I also prefer to fish lighter now, trying to get a good drift to get down and using longer leaders as well (which can be a challenge to cast). 

However, if the wind gets up I might be wishing I had an 8wt.  The other issue with an 8wt is that it can get rather tiring casting it the whole day. With a modern light 6wt you can go on all day without even noticing.

Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote RC17 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jun 2020 at 10:29am
RC17 View Drop Down
Silver
Silver


Joined: 28 Jan 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 313
The biggest mystery to me is how to keep the indicator bouyant with 10 ton of lead on the end haha. I mainly lake fish the Rotorua lakes but fish the rivers occasionally. Even with a good drift and no drag I find the second those flys get down my indicator is following. Short of using a cork it's a mystery to me how to keep the dam thing floating. Any tips?
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jun 2020 at 12:14pm
The Tamure Kid View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 25 Aug 2015
Location: Auckland
Status: Offline
Points: 3543
There are new ways of putting on indicators, particularly to make them adjustable on the leader. But for Tongariro etc I still tie my own on to a clip using quality glo bug yarn in different colours to suit different light conditions. Quality yarn is important, I believe. You get what you pay for.

My method - which seems to work pretty well - is based on two key things I was shown once by a guy who fished regularly at Otamangakau, sleeping overnight in the back of his old Nissan Terrano. He had perfected the art of indicator nymphing there, and his sailed amazingly. Even if you don't tie your own, the following works well on commercial ones of a similar design. 

1. Use a standard pocket hair comb to vigorously comb out the yarn after tying. You'd be surprised how much extra yarn comes away - stuff that would glug up and get waterlogged if you didn't comb it. That leaves nice, untangled wispy yarn that can be clipped to shape.

2. Dunk the whole thing in the lid saucer of a bottle of Liquid Mucilin - designed for dry flies - until it's nicely soaked. Remove and squeeze out the excess back into the bottle. Then dry the indicators on a paper towel overnight. I do a batch at once. 

With these two things done, the indicators shed water extremely well during casting. 

I keep 3-4 fresh fluffy ones in a little screw top plastic jar (very well cleaned ex Marmite jar etc) ready for a day on the water. If after a hammering they start to sink, they get replaced by a fresh one. Most of the time, one indicator is good for the whole day.
After the end of the day the used ones get re-combed and re-treated. They last ages if tied well and with quality yarn.



Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Sako Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jun 2020 at 11:20pm
Sako View Drop Down
Bronze
Bronze


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 17
I use a Scott NZ Special (6wgt) with a SA Amplitude Anadro fly line unless it starts to blow then it's the Sage Method 8wgt with an Anadro line.
 
For making an indicator I've found the troutboynz method the best:
 
 
 
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Jofly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2020 at 11:59am
Jofly View Drop Down
Gold
Gold
Avatar

Joined: 22 Jul 2008
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 767
I use sheep wool for an indicator. Either pluck from a fence or buy the NZ strike indicator wool if you want coloured ones.  Add some Stone Creek Hygel (http://www.flyfishinginxs.kiwi/product/floatant-hygel-stone-creek-non-silicone) and you have the equivalent of a cork LOL
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2020 at 12:14pm
The Tamure Kid View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 25 Aug 2015
Location: Auckland
Status: Offline
Points: 3543
Originally posted by Sako Sako wrote:

 
 
For making an indicator I've found the troutboynz method the best:
 
 
 

Nice one. I'll give that version with the cord a go. Good to see the last two steps are what I do now - comb and Mucilin, dry overnight.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fraser Hocks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2020 at 2:56pm
Fraser Hocks View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum


Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Location: Queenstown
Status: Offline
Points: 1304
Such a pity that the regs state  

"strike indicator
  1. a. means any synthetic or natural yarn, and its means of attachment to the line or cast, used by the person fishing as an aid to detect a strike; but
  2. b. does not include: i. any other material or any object attached to the line or cast; or ii. any synthetic or natural yarn to which has been added any material or chemical (other than a colour dye or surfactant line floatant preparation)"
Which means that Thingamabobbers and Loon Tip Toppers are out?  Does seem to be an overly conservative reg.   I understand the reason that this regulation was brought it, but does mean people end up tying ridiculous budgie style yarn indicators when clearly there are more practical solutions.  
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2020 at 3:50pm
The Tamure Kid View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 25 Aug 2015
Location: Auckland
Status: Offline
Points: 3543
Budgie? More like a parrot in some cases on the Lower Bridge Pool Smile

When I started fly fishing at the height of the Taupo nymphing boom, people used sticky foam 'tabs' which wrapped around the end of the line and had bright coating on the outside, or coloured foam fingers which had a synthetic loop out of each end - I tied the leader to one loop, and the other went through the loop at the end of the fly line.

But they outlawed those.

The evolution of the rules is interesting. There used to be a reg banning weight on flies above a certain size, and no split shot in the Taupo region. 
I think when I started it was supposedly illegal to use a fly that imitated roe...
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fraser Hocks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2020 at 4:28pm
Fraser Hocks View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum


Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Location: Queenstown
Status: Offline
Points: 1304
Yea some odd rule changes for sure.  Must say, the regulation meaning that all indicators must be made of yarn means I'm FAR more likely to use the double handed rod and swing a fly downstream instead of upstream nymph when I'm there later next month. 

Cocking around drying parrot (LOL) indicators all day long over just tying on a streamer and swinging a fly seems way more appealing.  
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Sako Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2020 at 4:48pm
Sako View Drop Down
Bronze
Bronze


Joined: 30 Aug 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 17
Originally posted by Fraser Hocks Fraser Hocks wrote:

....Which means that Thingamabobbers and Loon Tip Toppers are out? 
 
I don't think the Loon Tip Toppers would be illegal, not that I've ever used one.
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fishb8 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jun 2020 at 8:37am
Fishb8 View Drop Down
Titanium
Titanium
Avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2002
Location: Hamilton
Status: Offline
Points: 8826
My Taupo rod was/is a 7 wt CD GHR with an 8 wt line for Tongariro and 7 for the other rivers plus a sinking line.
I remember all those foam 'indicators', a #6 hook with about 1/2 ounce of lead cast out on a spinning rod - all perfectly legal before a law change.

I made several submissions on rule changes one of which was for that floating, hi-viz putty. It was difficult to wind a yarn indicator through the top-eye meant it was impossible to net a fish owing to the length of the leader. I got laughed at for that along with the suggestion for split shot and more than 2 flies.
Indicators with silicone are still giving added buoyancy, even now.
Fish roe or imitations were against the rules but saw everyone using them. Never sure why we have rules when they are totally ignored. Has anyone ever had their gear checked other than just a licence check. I'll need to re-read the current regs if I go back to Taupo.
edit
Is using a drone to fly my heavily weighted rig to the top of the pool illegal?
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken
Back to Top
Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Bigfishbob Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jun 2020 at 12:03pm
Bigfishbob View Drop Down
Platinum
Platinum


Joined: 19 Aug 2004
Location: Hamilton
Status: Offline
Points: 2803
7 wt is all you need Roy. I use a 6 wt Sage z-axis with a 7wt Rio Grande. I really like it. 
www.waikatosportfishing.co.nz
Back to Top
Forum Jump
Forum Permissions View Drop Down


This page was generated in 0.238 seconds.