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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote the croc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Oct 2020 at 11:41pm
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Originally posted by pjc pjc wrote:

Alan L that is what I thinking,fund FnB
Tongue n check I know but is legasea going to save the tuatara? One is land based issues and I guess covers marine birds while the is about protecting/saving fish stock hence the name.
 

F and B have put the Best Fish Guide out for the last 15 years or so:

https://www.forestandbird.org.nz/campaigns/best-fish-guide
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote the croc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Oct 2020 at 11:46pm
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Originally posted by pjc pjc wrote:

Here is the answer to NIWA selling surveyed fish areas

Hi Paul

Thanks for your e mail and apologies for the delayed reply. It arrived the day we were mobilising to leave for the survey, and we have been at sea with limited cell phone coverage since then.

In answer to your question, yes, commercial species of legal size are iced onboard and sold wherever practical, with the net revenue  from the sale paid to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

Kind regards

Emma

Sent from my iPhone

> On 8/10/2020, at 23:20, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Hello joneseg,
>
> paul carnahan ([email protected]) has sent you a message via your contact
> form (https://aus01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fniwa.co.nz%2Fuser%2F912%2Fcontact&amp;data=02%7C01%7CEmma.Jones%40niwa.co.nz%7Cdf3cbebaea27466b4f1c08d86b73b538%7C41caed736a0c468aba499ff6aafd1c77%7C0%7C1%7C637377492048022912&amp;sdata=4mijZl68gvh68dJZiRnN%2F155fOXkoYStzc%2BXwUtVaFs%3D&amp;reserved=0) at NIWA.
>
> this is a message forwarded from contact form on the NIWA website
>
> Message:
>
> Hi
> Can you confirm that fish caught being of legal in the trawl net will iced
> and sold. A claim that Legasea is making via Facebook while making people
> aware of the survey.
> Thank You
> Paul Carnahan
>


There's a bit more info on all the trawl surveys and other research here pjc: https://www.fisheries.govt.nz/dmsdocument/40796-Draft-for-consultation-Proposed-Fisheries-Research-Services-for-202021
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Thanks "The Croc"be interesting reading this afternoon.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote pjc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Oct 2020 at 5:09pm
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The Croc.  Had a scan through and yes ,lots of survey work being undertaken on majority of inshore species. Be interesting to see when all surveys completed .Which species increase or decrease. Most work to be completed by December 2021.
Certainly more survey work being undertaken than I thought.

Do you know where or how can survey results be accessed.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Alan L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Oct 2020 at 5:35pm
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That all looks encouraging Croc. Lots going on. But do you have any idea why Puka/Bass/Bluenose are still and have been studiously ignored for decades? It must be deliberate over that time period.
My only sneaking suspicion is that they are of low commercial viability?? In which case, who is calling the shots?
Regards
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote the croc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Oct 2020 at 8:56pm
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Originally posted by pjc pjc wrote:

The Croc.  Had a scan through and yes ,lots of survey work being undertaken on majority of inshore species. Be interesting to see when all surveys completed .Which species increase or decrease. Most work to be completed by December 2021.
Certainly more survey work being undertaken than I thought.

Do you know where or how can survey results be accessed.

All the most up to date information gets summarised in the plenary documents. 

If you want the survey documents themselves they can be found here: https://fs.fish.govt.nz/Page.aspx?pk=61&tk=209

It's not the most user friendly site but if you click the "Date" column header twice it will sort from newest to oldest so you can see the most recent published research. 
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote the croc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Oct 2020 at 9:50pm
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Originally posted by Alan L Alan L wrote:

That all looks encouraging Croc. Lots going on. But do you have any idea why Puka/Bass/Bluenose are still and have been studiously ignored for decades? It must be deliberate over that time period.
My only sneaking suspicion is that they are of low commercial viability?? In which case, who is calling the shots?
Regards
Alan

Hi Alan, 

There has been a heap of work done on bluenose over the years. Here's a bit of history from the plenary document:



Hapuku/bass frustrates the hell out of me. It should have been done years ago. The reason it hasn't been reviewed is there is a lack of biological information which to base an assessment. But no one has made it a priority to get that information so the situation never changes.

On that link above I sent to pjc I just saw this so it looks promising: FAR 2020/25 Feasibility of fishery independent longline surveys for snapper, hāpuku, bass, and bluenose "Longline catch effort data targeting snapper or hapuku/bass/bluenose were used to evaluate alternative longline survey designs, to monitor changes in the abundance. Commercial longline skippers were interviewed to identify commonly used gear configurations that could be used for a survey, and to understand factors that might affect catch rates. A longline survey could be used to monitor the SNA 1 stock, a catch sampling monitoring approach appears more feasible for the hapuku/bass." https://fs.fish.govt.nz/Page.aspx?pk=113&dk=24814

There are still reasonable fisheries (in terms of tonnage) for both bluenose and hapuku/bass but they have both been reduced pretty drastically.

671 tonnes of bluenose was caught last year down from a high of over 3000 tonnes in the early 2000s.  

1260 tonnes of hapuku/bass was caught last year down from a high of wellover 2000 tonnes in the early 80s. 

In terms of where the focus for stock assessment research goes yes it is (mostly) based around commercial importance. All commercial fishers pay levies which cover the cost of:
  • monitoring commercial fishing activities
  • fisheries stock assessment research
  • research necessary to manage and mitigate the effects of commercial fishing  on the aquatic environment and biodiversity, including protected species
  • monitoring commercial fishing activity through observer coverage
  • administering commercial fishing services, registries and quota.
Which fisheries get most focus depends which tier they are in:
  • Tier 1 – are high volume, high value quota management system (QMS) stocks that commercial fishers usually target.
  • Tier 2 – are QMS stocks that are smaller or less valuable bycatch fisheries, or are only targeted at certain times of the year.
  • Tier 3 – are bycatch species that aren't managed through the QMS.
A massive issue that all governments have been responsible for is the huge underinvestment in fisheries research. This means MPI has to focus on fisheries which receive the most levies, hence commercially important species. This report by The Nature Conservancy is worth a skim if you have time: https://www.nature.org/media/asia-pacific/new-zealand-fisheries-quota-management.pdf



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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Alan L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Oct 2020 at 3:21pm
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Thanks Croc - you are a mine of information.
In my discussions with MPI (over the state of our local fishery) we did discuss the dismal record on Puka. Basically she just apologised. They know they have failed. But she did say it was on the current to-do list in this years programme. My understanding is they are about to make a start. But as your post shows - they basically don't know how to go about it.
Regards
Alan
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote the croc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Oct 2020 at 10:22pm
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Yep there is also another $400K project "Low Information Stock Status Assessment" which is due out soon.

"Rationale:

General:
Low information stocks are difficult to assess using traditional stock assessment methods.
Many low information inshore finfish stocks do not currently have an adequate assessment of
stock status and it is not known if current catches are sustainable.
Recent developments in spatially explicit risk assessment allow for the evaluation of stock
status assessments for low information stocks. These methods may allow a more formal
evaluation of the data and uncertainty in estimating the status of stocks than qualitative or
semi-qualitative assessments, and may be more suitable for situations where there is
inadequate information for a fully quantitative stock assessment. Project LSP2017-02 initiated
methods development for the consideration of low information stocks using low information
and spatially explicit methods.
MPI consider that the methods development initiated under LSP2017-02 will be further
developed and applied to additional stocks and areas, as appropriate.
The stock status estimates from this project will need to be explicit with respect to uncertainty.
The outputs will allow MPI to identify sources of uncertainty for individual stock estimates and
hence allow prioritisation of additional information or research required to ensure that the
estimates are suitable for decision making. The method will also allow testing of assumptions
and alternate management scenarios, including spatial management, mitigation uptake,
changes to gear or fishing methods, and additional investments in monitoring (i.e., observer
coverage and electronic reporting) on predicted outcomes"

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Sanchez Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Nov 2020 at 8:56am
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Great info. Learnt a lot, thanks croc. Also this is worth a read since a new community covid case is mostly likely caused by sealords Russian fishermen. More tax $ down the toilet. I don't know if this article is on the nose but it doesn't look good for them.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/123172997/job-ad-targeting-foreign-fishermen-trying-to-skirt-immigration-rules-union-says
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (2) Likes(2)   Quote pjc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Dec 2020 at 2:52pm
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Had a call from a legasea rep before xmas and it didnt go well.I hung up.
Banging on about the need to ban dredges as the public want them banned,really no one asked me. I did mentioned what about commercial ban,surely the weight of comms dredge would do more damage the recc dredge?
Quick change of tack and on to rescuefish,I said well obviously not received well due to lack of support or you would of hit the 50k by now.Went on about turning all inshore trawler's in to longliners.Hmm.
From what I can see for sna1 only there are about 30 operating 130 inshore trawlers.So longliners fish closer inshore and lay about 3000 hooks each,by converting 130 trawlers to longliners that would then give a rough total of 480000 hooks potentially laid each day?

not very sustainable for inshore where mum/dad/families fish?or do I have it wrong.


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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Pcj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2021 at 8:21am
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Hi all
Just been banned from "Legasea" Facebook page and have comments removed. It appears one cannot speak out against them if it doesn't fit their agenda. Of late there has been posts which they should of fact checked first.
Scallops in the Opito bay/mercury bay area.The decline has been put down to commercial dredging but the commercial guys haven't been in there for a number of yrs. When one comments about should be looking on the land at the runoffs of silt etc you get the negative comment"push your own barrow on it if you want"

Legasea praising themselves over the court case for Terakihi, but that all comes down to forest and Bird who ,through donations, took the Ministry to court.


For Legasea or any other advocacy group to truly succeed. Join forces with Greenpeace/FnB who seem have no problem getting funds and become an outreach. Might break up the old boy net work .  

Shark finning hit the news again but what do the NZSFC have??Season awards for sharks,one sided one thinks. Its about waste so why not get some $$ better than dumping at sea,unlike the poor tuna boys n girls who if accidently hook a sword in the nz economic zone must dump.Wasteage.

There is strong talk coming out, maybe released on Tuesday that will require all commercial fish to be land ,regardless of size or quota held. One sided again considering that we catch more snapper in the Hauraki gulf than commercial. Should we not be responsible and land all our catch too?

Guess my thinking and others goes against Legaseas ideas so hence the ban.

Feel free to make comments on my negativty towards them .But 8 yrs on still nothing achieved,still sitting and talking . Which reminds me .Yes option4 won the Kahawai legal challenge a few yrs ago but the schools have not recovered annd still being extract as craybait for Aussies.So what was achieved??
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote marlinmarty Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2021 at 10:20am
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PJ
Sadly you too often come across as simply negative nellie without a credible alternate point.
The scallop argument is about bulk removal depleting breeding stocks across all of coro.
Comms actially have less rights then Recs by law it only now being enforced.
Runoff is a weak debate unless you table a relative study.
If you feel ostracized by a perceived old boys network ( your words) suggest you hook up with the Tindall Foundation you will be right at home.
It took 35 years to reconstruct the QMS to suit big business it might take that long to fix it on a shoestring budget.
Lighten up.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Tzer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2021 at 11:48am
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Originally posted by marlinmarty marlinmarty wrote:

PJ
Sadly you too often come across as simply negative nellie without a credible alternate point.
The scallop argument is about bulk removal depleting breeding stocks across all of coro.
Comms actially have less rights then Recs by law it only now being enforced.
Runoff is a weak debate unless you table a relative study.
If you feel ostracized by a perceived old boys network ( your words) suggest you hook up with the Tindall Foundation you will be right at home.
It took 35 years to reconstruct the QMS to suit big business it might take that long to fix it on a shoestring budget.
Lighten up.


Marlinmarty, sadly I have to somewhat agree with Paul. Advocacy groups such as Legasea, Ban Commercial Inshore Fishing (which I know your vocal on), and Greenpeace etc. do ban individuals whose comments don’t align with their own beliefs. In regard to posts/comment made on Legaseas page, those administering the page have deleted comments (it might be their prerogative) that they don’t want made, whether there genuine or not.

 Case in mind was when Legasea put up a post about Sanford’s trawler supposedly trawling inside Bream Heads without any factual evidence, certain comments made by both commercial & recreational were deleted, including one I made. Legasea is quite happy to leave comments up from commercial why? because it’s easy to have supporters look to discredit anything they say all the while hiding in the background but when recreational question Legasea their quick to remove those comments as it would appear to let’s say Government agencies monitoring comments that there is disunity within the recreational sector.

 If any of what Paul says is only partly true what has the likes of Legasea got to hide by banning or deleting individuals comments, sure anything that is derogatory or threatening by all means but it seem then this organisation is being caught up in this PC world of censuring free speech. I do find it interesting that Legasea seem to be riding the success on the court case taken by Forrest & Bird judging by some of the comments that they played a part. If NZSFC/Legasea is so concerned with the state of our fisheries when then don’t they look to take the same course of action F & B has done with fish stocks that great affect recreational, while their plan is to be a public outreach organisation, do you really think the ordinary person on the street really cares how their fish is caught for their Friday night fish & chips, hell some think their meat comes from the butcher and not the farm.

Whether you like it or not there is a perceived mind-set by some that the NZSFC/Legasea is run by the old boy’s network and yes I am one of them, my perception is not from what I read but I have seen it first-hand. No doubt you will find cause to chastise my comments but I don’t really care, I have been quite open with any of my previous comments that I don’t support them. While I think recreational need such an organisation like Legasea and there are some creditable people within it but I won’t support them while those heading the organisation push their own ideals/beliefs on the recreational sector in a manner that can be misleading at times.

Legasea is no different to any other advocacy group, while they all say they aren’t anti commercial much of how they post topics only looks to incite followers which then portrays an Us versus Them situation, if they’re going to post something up try engaging with those commenting by answering some of the posts and not sit back and let what could be good debateable topics turn sour.  New Zealand fishery is a share one and we are all part of the problem and solution. Perhaps Legasea’s main body should take a leaf out of Legasea Hawkes Bay book, while there are still genuine concerns in the bay at least they are having meaningful dialogue with their local commercial fisherman.

The government recent stance towards commercial will have ramifications for all and if recreational think that this government is going to stop with just the commercial sector I think recreational are just deluding themselves.

Yes it is a wet and miserable day down here and I have nothing better to do.

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Pcj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2021 at 12:03pm
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Originally posted by marlinmarty marlinmarty wrote:

PJ
Sadly you too often come across as simply negative nellie without a credible alternate point.
The scallop argument is about bulk removal depleting breeding stocks across all of coro.
Comms actially have less rights then Recs by law it only now being enforced.
Runoff is a weak debate unless you table a relative study.
If you feel ostracized by a perceived old boys network ( your words) suggest you hook up with the Tindall Foundation you will be right at home.
It took 35 years to reconstruct the QMS to suit big business it might take that long to fix it on a shoestring budget.
Lighten up.
Shoe string budget.Hmm If they joined forces the budget would be almost unlimited.

On the scallop front have read from "stuff news" and the article pretty much goes along with what I have been saying about sediment,chemicals.As shellfish are bi valve,suck in/spit out water at the same time being poisened by man,and will leave the area.



Williams said the three main potentially interacting stressors for the scallop’s habitat were likely sedimentation, disturbance to the sea bed, and over-enrichment of nutrients.

He said resuspended sediments in the water column could be a major problem for scallops and other shellfish which filter feed, sucking in water to acquire plankton.

“If they’re sucking in muddy water it's more difficult to breathe and filter the available food, and the deposition of suspended sediments can bury them and alter their habitat.”

“In some places it’s like a cloud out there, if you dive near the bottom it all becomes resuspended really easily ... It’s really a combination of things happening where those shellfish are struggling to get hold and grow.”

Marty I have posted before on this but here we go again.Before Pine harbour went in ,you could get pipis/cockles at Tepuna bay below beachlands .Now its black sticky mud with dead shells underneath.The rock just from the entrance supported healthy mussels but now ,still there but taste of deisel/antifoul etc. So if we contnue poisoning the waterways the future is not bright.So the campains on the seas needs to take place on the lanmd.So why jion forces with Grenpeace/FnB and have a real voice rather than making submissions upon submission to Fisheries that  seem to go.Oh another email,file it.  

Negative it may seem but thats reallity the way I see it.

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Pcj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2021 at 12:24pm
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Originally posted by marlinmarty marlinmarty wrote:

PJ
Sadly you too often come across as simply negative nellie without a credible alternate point.
The scallop argument is about bulk removal depleting breeding stocks across all of coro.
Comms actially have less rights then Recs by law it only now being enforced.
Runoff is a weak debate unless you table a relative study.
If you feel ostracized by a perceived old boys network ( your words) suggest you hook up with the Tindall Foundation you will be right at home.
It took 35 years to reconstruct the QMS to suit big business it might take that long to fix it on a shoestring budget.
Lighten up.
Found what I was looking for.
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/state-of-the-gulf-auckland-council-report-finds-estuaries-choking-in-sediment-shellfish-dying/TDHCKJ57VR5AJFBHPZAXOXKFL4/?ref=readmore


Nearly half the shellfish at a monitoring site in one of Auckland's treasured estuaries died over a three-year period, according to a report that has found sediment increasingly choking the marine environment.

If uncontrolled, sediment - including mud and silt - can be washed into the city's waterways and surrounding harbours, devastating marine ecosystems.

The State of the Gulf 2020 report highlighted sediment as one of the Hauraki Gulf's biggest issues, impacting everything from snapper stocks to shellfish beds, and increasing mud at inner-city beaches.


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Fellas

This could go several ways.

1. All Rec fishers got involved behind Legasea and it has real clout. Currently we are all talk and no action. 5 or 10% actually support legasea financially.

Under FnB it will have no say.

2. NZSFC says nah stuff it we will close Legasea down.

3.Govt makes us get licensed but changes nothing.

4. A govt sanctioned and "controlled " PEAK body is formed to advocate for rec fishing.

5. Legasea has a strategic goal and its all about rescue fish. Anything else to be frank is fiddling while Rome burns.

Its a free world we can all have an opinion, my opinion is its a little better world with Legasea in our space... and I don't always agree with what they say or do.

On the whole its way better than nothing.

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Latest Media release"seafoodnz"
Hauraki Gulf changes raise challenges and opportunities On Tuesday, when the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries, David Parker announced the longflagged revitalisation of the Hauraki Gulf, it was in response to the “Sea Change” plan prepared four years earlier. As with any such initiative, not all parties were happy. Trawling will be restricted to ‘corridors’ in the Gulf, there will be a bespoke fisheries plan, and 18 new marine protected areas (MPAs) will increase coverage threefold to 17.6 percent. Whilst saying it is a great first step, members of the Hauraki Gulf Forum are still hoping that 30 percent of the Gulf will be protected in the future and all trawling and dredging banned completely. Commercial scallop operations may continue but they will be restricted to areas already dredged, while recreational scallop dredging will be banned. A thriving marine environment is of paramount importance to the commercial seafood industry and we look forward to working with government on how to implement the changes. In doing so, the true costs and benefits of what’s proposed must be assessed rationally and an evidencebased approach adopted. The announcement does, however, raise some questions, including around the new proposals for different categories of marine protection, including a new “Special Management Area”, which will allow “carefully managed and targeted” recreational fishing. The announcement did not identify these areas, or how they will be managed and monitored. In National Panel Surveys conducted by NIWA, it is revealed that recreational fishers haul nearly twice as many snapper out of the inner Gulf than commercial fishers (2,068 tonnes to 1,096 tonnes). Given the importance of the area for recreational fishing, there are many welcome changes mooted for the recreational fishing sector, which places a huge pressure on the Gulf. But if the Gulf really is a jewel in our maritime crown, and an area so important to recreational fishing, why is there such reluctance for relatively simple but important measures like recreational catch reporting? Industry is relieved that its consistent calls for a quicker reaction to reducing bag limits is being considered, by changing the decision making from a Cabinet sign off to a Gazette notice. We welcome more controls on charter vessel reporting, presumably from a paper-based system to an electronic reporting system, and we welcome the proposal, although have little faith in its eventual implementation, of a registry of recreational vessels. This is not a ‘us versus them’ dig at reccies. It is a genuine desire to see some control on the thousands of vessels that use the Gulf as their playground. As most of the catch in the inner Gulf is recreational, the government’s will to address this and get a more accurate picture of the catch is to be applauded. It comes as some surprise to the general public and recreational fishers, that the restrictions already placed on commercial fishing in the Gulf are extensive. There are already trawl prohibitions, Danish seine prohibitions, net prohibitions and seasonal prohibitions. The maps below show current restrictions (left) and proposed additional restrictions (right), although Special Management Areas are still to be identified.

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Originally posted by Pcj Pcj wrote:

Latest Media release"seafoodnz"
Hauraki Gulf changes raise challenges and opportunities On Tuesday, when the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries, David Parker announced the longflagged revitalisation of the Hauraki Gulf, it was in response to the “Sea Change” plan prepared four years earlier. As with any such initiative, not all parties were happy. Trawling will be restricted to ‘corridors’ in the Gulf, there will be a bespoke fisheries plan, and 18 new marine protected areas (MPAs) will increase coverage threefold to 17.6 percent. Whilst saying it is a great first step, members of the Hauraki Gulf Forum are still hoping that 30 percent of the Gulf will be protected in the future and all trawling and dredging banned completely. Commercial scallop operations may continue but they will be restricted to areas already dredged, while recreational scallop dredging will be banned. A thriving marine environment is of paramount importance to the commercial seafood industry and we look forward to working with government on how to implement the changes. In doing so, the true costs and benefits of what’s proposed must be assessed rationally and an evidencebased approach adopted. The announcement does, however, raise some questions, including around the new proposals for different categories of marine protection, including a new “Special Management Area”, which will allow “carefully managed and targeted” recreational fishing. The announcement did not identify these areas, or how they will be managed and monitored. In National Panel Surveys conducted by NIWA, it is revealed that recreational fishers haul nearly twice as many snapper out of the inner Gulf than commercial fishers (2,068 tonnes to 1,096 tonnes). Given the importance of the area for recreational fishing, there are many welcome changes mooted for the recreational fishing sector, which places a huge pressure on the Gulf. But if the Gulf really is a jewel in our maritime crown, and an area so important to recreational fishing, why is there such reluctance for relatively simple but important measures like recreational catch reporting? Industry is relieved that its consistent calls for a quicker reaction to reducing bag limits is being considered, by changing the decision making from a Cabinet sign off to a Gazette notice. We welcome more controls on charter vessel reporting, presumably from a paper-based system to an electronic reporting system, and we welcome the proposal, although have little faith in its eventual implementation, of a registry of recreational vessels. This is not a ‘us versus them’ dig at reccies. It is a genuine desire to see some control on the thousands of vessels that use the Gulf as their playground. As most of the catch in the inner Gulf is recreational, the government’s will to address this and get a more accurate picture of the catch is to be applauded. It comes as some surprise to the general public and recreational fishers, that the restrictions already placed on commercial fishing in the Gulf are extensive. There are already trawl prohibitions, Danish seine prohibitions, net prohibitions and seasonal prohibitions. The maps below show current restrictions (left) and proposed additional restrictions (right), although Special Management Areas are still to be identified.


"Commercial scallop operations may continue but they will be restricted to areas already dredged, while recreational scallop dredging will be banned"
Yup, that will help. Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Pcj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jul 2021 at 6:19pm
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Joined: 27 Nov 2019
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Points: 776
Perhaps the Legasea supporters can explain why Legasea puts up posts that concern all but will not or refuse to
answer or engage with supporters 
Being banned is great as I can sit back and see who is posting and next minute Legasea admins remove comments when those comments are against legasea thinking. 
Where are not anti commercial.Hmm maybe not anti longliners but over a period of time a longliner will extract more or less than a trawler as more trawlers convert to long lining.
One poster has his post removed as it is proven that those involved the Mao Mao scandal are of Asian decent,but post removed under the hate speech.
Now there is a new post up which anti commercial.It appears the our own MarlinMarty has become Legaseas spokesman as he is quick to condeem those that critise or those who defend commercial.Remember Legasea keeps saying we are not anti commercial

Is the issue that those who comment are showing Legasea up for what many have said including one of their sponsor/supporter(helped put  fishcare together)want funds but??

now this. Oh please just answer the question that are put up and then there would be no need for this??
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