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How to fillet fish video

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    Posted: 04 Nov 2019 at 6:29pm
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Titanium
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I put this together a while back and only just got around to editing it and uploading. It's really for beginners who don't know a lot about filleting.


A king on the bricks is worth 5 in a boat.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Nov 2019 at 8:27am
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Yep .. what I call "Rec fisherman " filleting.. a bit of care and leave little on the frame or back of the head.

I have changed added bits and pieces to filleting over the yrs.  End of a day, we fillet up, and compare little tricks, methods and stuff.

A big note made of the thickness of the filleting board...a must.. for the weight, not to slide, and the height for easy access to cutting sideways

A cheap filleting glove is a good idea, not to stop slipping and cutting yourself, but make holding the fish/ fillets easy..espec when comes to skinning.

Pulling that knife back facing towards yourself is scarry.

 There is a very small grove each side of the top fins. Tip of a sharp knife into just at the back of the top fin , slice shallow up that grove to the head, then cut back to the spine.

Also dont remove the 1st side.. that makes the fish bend when taking off the 2nd. The bend means cant  run straight runs with the knife.

 Like the way the ribs are lifted... I like to slip the tip of the knife up underneath from the tail end, blade up...lift. Turn the knife and roll the ribs out.

 Pin bones can be a challenge for the inexperienced.. even experienced taking way too much meat away with them.
 1st slice like you  then I split the fillet.. like they are in fish shops.
Smaller fillets the belly flap part goes well in curries , fish bite etc.


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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MightyBoosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Nov 2019 at 1:50pm
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Nice clear video Thumbs Up I do it the same way, but have dispensed with the chopping board for taking the fillet off as the knife doesn't come anywhere near the work surface. I use a chopping board for the other parts of the process though. 

I try to remember to leave one fillet partially attached to make taking off the other fillet easier, but almost always forget!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote LBGer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Dec 2019 at 9:34pm
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The ol' leave a fillet on the other side trick..... Thumbs Up
A king on the bricks is worth 5 in a boat.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote pjc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2019 at 6:24am
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For some unknown reason I always end up with one fillet with more meat than the other,But I leave the fillet attached to the tail for skinning rather than removing.

Must see SANTA need a decent filleting knife, what is good a knife LBGer?
water water everywhere,how many fish does it hold?
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote LBGer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2019 at 6:29am
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Depends a bit on your preferences of super thin or thicker blade - I just got a Svord filleting knife and although its not like a traditional thin bladed flexible knife, it cuts through anything fishy easily. I didn't mean to get the carbon steel one, probably would have preferred the stainless blade cause the carbon one stains if you leave a drop of water on it. About $119, wooden handle and really well made... I have a thin bladed one as well for skinning. It's extra long for the likes of kingfish.....I would recommend the Svord for sure....
A king on the bricks is worth 5 in a boat.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote pjc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2019 at 6:35am
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Thanks
water water everywhere,how many fish does it hold?
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Daniel K Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2019 at 11:05am
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Have you guys tried the japanese method? 
It takes quite a bit more effort in that you need to scale, gut, and dispatch the head of the fish, but it's also very satisfying to do. I eat a lot of my fish with the skin on so I started doing it and really enjoy it. You also use a Deba knife which is fun to work with.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2019 at 11:36am
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probably would have preferred the stainless blade cause the carbon one stains if you leave a drop of water on it

 Quality stainless blades are also high carbon and yeah will rust if left laying on a wet bench.. and stain.

 I have a aerosol can of non stick carbina (?) cooking oil handy
does the smoker racks , the outside of smoker...light spray on filleting chopping boards, band saw  drill press triton work station, hand saws..Wink

Value for money I liked the green river.. now obsoleted.. or rather renamed to Victory..and like the svords, converted to convex stroping to sharpen.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote LBGer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2019 at 12:16pm
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Daniel - I have seen the Japanese method of breaking down a fish, looks more complicated although I can see it would also be a satisfying method to use...
Steps - I had asked my wife to get the stainless blade but ended up with the carbon steel  knife. I have to oil it more than my other blades and be more vigilant.
I still have one of my very first filleting knives - cost me like $6.99, now about 33 years old. I picked up a Rapala filleting knife left on the rocks one day, still got that one too - almost 20 years ago. 
A king on the bricks is worth 5 in a boat.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MightyBoosh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2019 at 12:40pm
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Filleting scaled snapper is almost a pleasure!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Dec 2019 at 8:37am
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I still have my original filleting , skinning and carving knives from around ' 70/72.. all wood handle carbon steel green rivers.
 Skining and carving now in kitchen, filleting  SS green river and victory knives.
 
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