Heat shrunk lure hooks

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    Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 9:43am
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Here's some of my art-work done on my lures, as discussed on another thread.





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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Kerren Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 10:04am
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ahhhh....look at all them pretty colours!......nice work fella!!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote obald Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 11:09am
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 Hi Roy,

Very neat and tidy. I've been doing much the same but with a second hook heat shrunk onto the hookset and the whole lot then shackled to the leader. What the pictures don't show very well (although the middle pic of the two Hookers I think gives the info)and I would like to clarify is the leader to wire join. Is this crimped leader loop (+/- thimble) on leader direct to crimped wire loop all covered in heat shrink (i.e  loop to loop)?

As you may have seen in an earlier thread I am about to start experimenting on running lures with different hooksets to see how they affect lure action - I'll keep all posted if I find out anything that I probably should have known anyway (and most people probably already do!)

obald

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Fishb8 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 12:41pm
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Hi Obald

Yes you're right. On these lures, I have a s/s thimble and wire anti-chaff sleeve on the mono, through the eye of the wire. I have done some experiments on this bit. the anti-chaff sleve protects the leader mono from excessive heat during the shrinking process. My tests were fairly un-scientific as there is no way I can pull and break a 300 lb leader. Without the sleeves, the mono does get affected by heat and it will weaken. I attach the hook to a secure anchor, then heave with all my might.

Other lures, not shown, have a shackle with heatshrink over it. It doesn't look as tidy but hooks can be removed easily and re-heat shrunk. The Hooker lures have the best method of hook location with their cross slot. Don't know why other lure makers don't take up this idea.

The black and white Hooker is a real gem, bagging 2 stripies a couple of yellowfin and some kingies too. The Evil medium Sprocket has had some success, sort of. One day off Raglan in 98 I got 4 hook-ups in 2 hours but managed to lose the lot. A litany of self-made foul-ups. I was only trolling 1 marlin lure but we had plenty of albacore action and it was like something out of the Marx Brothers as we got marlin hits out of the albie schools. I'm convinced that the hooked albies attracted the marlin, like a living berley.  Any thoughts or experiences on that? I have another example for later that makes me think that it's more than co-incidence.

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote dustin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 1:12pm
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Thanks for the photos Roy, how are you putting them up?  I want to get some of my own stuff scanned, would be fun to compare notes. 

I remember one day in late July when we were fishing with a bunch of share charters and pulling out decent size skipjack tuna from a small area on the south coast.  We'd had four or five as I recall as we kept working back and forth picking up hits on the small lure on the stinger rod from what was obviously a school.  Then as I was mopping up trying to keep up the long corner went, unseen bite that turned out to be a 650 Blue.  That fish had obviously been lurking around the same area, he was right in the middle of those skipjacks but the funny thing was, he had probably been watching us drag skippies to the boat without attempting to go for any of the hooked fish.  Funny that.

cheers dustin

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Kerren Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 1:36pm
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Hi ya Dustin...

Once scanned you need to upload (easy to follow instructions) your JPEGS to www.momentoffame.com (or similar), this will give you a webpage (html) to view your picture...then you need to right click on top of the picture, you will then get the option {open image in new window}....once that page (.jpg) opens you need to copy and paste the URL (page address) into the Add Picture function on these forums (second button on the right, next to the smiley face) and viola!...confussed?...not surprissed!...

We have had stripies push past a whole spread of sexy proven marlin lures to bat down skippies we have hooked on our bungy lines...damn annoying that!....especially when livies are thin on the ground...don't get a descent shot at the marlie and lose the bait in one foul swoop!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote obald Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 5:17pm
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Hi again Roy,

I too have had a strike (but not a fish to the boat) from an obviously much larger fish when catching alberts - not really all that surprising when you think about it.

My only worry about your pictures (and why I made the enquiry) is the point you raised in your reply i.e. shrinkwrap over the leader. I would be so worried about the heat on the mono that I would not do it. Your precautions sound good and your testing is probably as good as you can do without linetesting gear (does the stuff around test up to 300, 400lb - dunno), but there must be some effect on the mono and I would suspect it wont be making it stronger and won't be the same every time. I am going to use tape here when I am making up my 'stiff' rigs - which I have decided I will have a quick session at this evening - your pics have galvanised me into action!

cheers

obald

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote JW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Sep 2002 at 6:46pm
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How come game fishing lures have the hook near the back of the lure? I thought predatory fish generally homed in on the eyes of a lure/fish when they hit. Does having the hook near the head ruin the action of the lure or does it just not result in hook ups? I've never been game fishing before but am interested to know how it all works. Do most marlin hit lures from the side or behind and do you generally see them before they hit??

Cheers

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote obald Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep 2002 at 10:56am
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Hi Roy (and others)

This morning's thought (well last night's actually whilst rigging hooksets) is that when rigging single hook stiff rigs (which your pics are) would people use wire (with the loop to loop join as above) at all or just take the leader to the hook, round the hook shank and back up to the crimp measured to to lie at the base of the lure head to the desired length to get the hook lying where wanted and then tape the doubled leader and hook to finish off. This avoids a join and the hook can be lined up with the lure and fixed however you desire (toothpicks, drilled out heads with inserts or whatever).

Would welcome peoples ideas on this

obald

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote dustin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep 2002 at 11:49am
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I guess the short answer to that one Obald is how many toothy critters!

The skipper I worked for in 2000 who went over to stiff singles this year with good success rigged them as follows: Leader is crimped to the hook and then a piece of tube is run between the hook and head as a spacer and anti chafe.  Peter had a variety of different size tube at hand to build up the thickness.  I recall he'd start with a clear plastic tubing, the same stuff as used for loop protectors, which started behind the crimp and extended through the lure head (he'd bore out the lurehead on a drillpress to accomodate it) and about a couple inches in front of the lure face (big lures).  He'd use about a foot or so of heavy duty shrink tube next to stiffen the hook rig.  Then between the back of the lurehead and the hook he'd slide on a larger diameter piece of stiff plastic tube, roughly 1 cm dia. or a bit less.  The back end of the lure would be drilled to accomodate the large diameter tube (which also functioned as a locking device) and then Peter would wrap the bend of the hook down to behind the lure head with tape.  I liked this setup because with the long skirts on these large lures you got about a foot of extra chafe resistance which is just what you want when the "Big Blue Bitch" is chewing away at your leader in her jaw hinge although Peter used exclusively 900# commercial longline mono leader anyway.

This is the result:

Boat: Katherine B (Funchal, Madeira), Skipper: Capt. Peter Bristow, Angler: Carl Ward, Wireman: Capt. Mark Lee.  July 2002, Madeira. 

cheers, dustin

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Kerren Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep 2002 at 11:56am
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good to see you worked out how to post pictures Dustin!!.......I am going to sit back and wait for the slide-show to begin!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Master Jig Builder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Sep 2002 at 11:20am
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JW

Not all skirted lures have just the one single hook at the rear. In this case it would be because of the length of the lure. These are 6-8" long I suspect and in that case, most anglers settle for a single hook.

Anymore than 1 hook in this sized lure can also effect the lure action.

The hook is set back because of the trolling speed they are worked at. By the time the fish runs at the head and strikes, the hook will be close to the right hook up position.

On larger lures (12-16" long), some game anglers put a double hook rig into the lure using a range of different methods.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote dustin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Sep 2002 at 12:12pm
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Hi JW,

I think you're right that predator fish do use the eyes of a bait or lure to help target it, with Wahoo and Spanish Mackerel on smallish skirted lures, they would invariably bite directly behind the eye of the skirt as you could see by the damage to the skirt.  If you were unlucky your lure would get a radical haircut directly behind the eye and if you were real unlucky you wouldn't even hook the fish!  Obviously they knew that if they cut their target off behind the eye they'd get the maximum amount of meat.  For this reason all the smaller lures rigged with single hooks on the charter boat I fished on at Phuket (Thailand) had the single hook right up behind the head.  This set up is all you need on Tuna and Dorado, as you definitely don't need fancy hook rigs to hook these.  (IMO). 

Billfish are the ones that keep chat boards going with the different theories about which rig works best.  With these bloody things it's not so easy to figure out how they're hitting a lure as individual fish can behave so differently.  Most good marlin lures end up with an awful lot of marks on the head but if you tape up your lure rigs you'll find that the tape gets roughed up quite a bit too but the marks just don't show as well on the skirts as on the head.   I've seen a lot of video showing billfish taking the lure from behind and to one side and quickly turning away from the boat.   But, I've personally seen quite a few billfish attacking from directly behind, maybe it looks a little different above the water?  That far back single hook rig is meant to let the fish grab the lure in the middle and turn away before the hook goes in.  They do turn away fast once they've caught the bait or lure or even think they have.  But, a single hook just behind the head worked well for me on white marlin and spearfish with small lures, and most blues caught on bigger lures w/two hook rigs are hooked on the front hook as well as the back hook. 

As for the question do you see them before they hit, the silly answer is: It all depends how awake you are!  In my limited experience, if fishing sailfish using rigged natural baits, you ought to see the fish almost all the time before he hits once you've got some experience (as you may see only a little bit of fin, bill or tail).  White marlin will sneak in on you and take the lure unseen but more often you'll see the fin or tail behind the lure, often you'll see the fish actually have a few potshots at the lure before he makes his mind up and takes the lure (or not).  You'll get the unseen bites with blue marlin too ("big hole bent pole") but you'll see many of your blues too and because they're big they're easy to see, some will behave less aggressively almost like a massive white marlin but others will crash the lure with awesome violence.  If a big one does this to you you'll still have shaking knees half an hour after the fish is gone. 

That's why most keen billfishermen love wearing zany American goggles and suffer from an obssesional urge to stare at the wake, even if there are no hooks out!

cheers, dustin

ps. Kerren you'll need to wait a bit for the slideshow sorry, I still need to get my pics scanned.  The one with Peter's fish was courtesy his site.

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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote JW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Sep 2002 at 2:40pm
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Great info! Thanks for that. I've got to have a go at this if it's the last thing I do
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