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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote reel crayze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Nov 2021 at 2:42pm
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If the fishing's pretty good life is usually pretty good Thumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote smudge Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Nov 2021 at 3:08pm
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That's what gardening is for, those times you can't go fishing. My garden gets no attention from Frebruary until August Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote reel crayze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Nov 2021 at 3:30pm
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A mates wife used to take a photo of the garden soon as my mate started salmon fishing each season... and the caption was it will never look like this good until the salmon season ends LOL.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Clutch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Nov 2021 at 11:30pm
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I don't have a lot of garden But I see the Feijoa are flowering like crazy this year as are the passionfruit and grapefruit.

But my main concerns are for my 50ish Frangipani plants just coming out of dormancy right now.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote lingee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Nov 2021 at 8:35am
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Hi clutch.i bought frangis in to nz 30 odd years ago, from fiji,raro,and nuie around 3000 cuttings per year for about 6 years. 3 months in quarintine,and had them in flower for xmas. they were sold all over nz.they are a lovely flower. what colours have you got.cheers
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Clutch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Nov 2021 at 10:14am
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Originally posted by lingee lingee wrote:

Hi clutch.i bought frangis in to nz 30 odd years ago, from fiji,raro,and nuie around 3000 cuttings per year for about 6 years. 3 months in quarintine,and had them in flower for xmas. they were sold all over nz.they are a lovely flower. what colours have you got.cheers

Well the 2 I bought 4 years ago are the traditional favourite white with yellow but all the rest I have grown from seed and am yet to have them flower......but I see at least 2 of mine have inflows this year....both look pink ....Pink Lemonade is the colour...can't wait to see my seedlings flower around christmas.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote lingee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Nov 2021 at 8:22am
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how old are the seedlings, cuttings root in warm water, take a cutting and let the end dry ,cuttings are taken when dormant around august.we would ship them to nz ,so around 3 weeks before we put them in a container of water,we had bottom heat,but summer cuttings will root in the same way or in a lose sand mix. remember to dry cuttings place them in shade not full sun. drying slowly is the key so the cut end starts to callous
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Clutch Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Nov 2021 at 11:12pm
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3 years old
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote reel crayze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Nov 2021 at 1:15pm
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Originally posted by BananaBoat BananaBoat wrote:

Who here does intensive planting

In a space of 1.2m square, I planted out 42 silverbeet & 28 lettuce of different varieties
Covered up with netting, keep the bloody blackbirds digging them up before the plants are well established
Next door are spinach in a space of 1.2x1.2m space = 72 spinach

The soil is very good, a mixture of home made compost, horsey poos & bokashi.. when dug up, lots of worms
Just green leaf veg grown here. When it heats up, its partially covered by shade cloth, certainly helps when the sun wants to cook the veges

Big thanks to BB. I saw this post and thought this is worth a crack. I planted 6 lettuces in the space of what i normally would of planted 2 and have been cutting the outside leaves to go with the mesclun leaves. I am now taking out every 3rd lettuce as required inside and allowing the others a bit of space. This is a great system and I encourage others to give it a crack. Again BB thanks.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote lingee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Nov 2021 at 3:05pm
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mate dig up large area in the back lawn ,plant a lot of veg ,kids can go to the park to play if u live in a 4-600 sq section ,food will be up in price over the next comming years, start growing food .we have land and we grow 8 months of veg and working on that,fresh is best.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote BananaBoat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Nov 2021 at 7:32pm
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reel crayze

That part of the garden has certainly changed.... its all gone to seed, except the new celery planted just before the photo was taken.
I got 2yrs out of the spinach & plenty of it in return from them.... the entire garden has been ripped up & replanted with new leafy stuff... 72 spinach, 42 silverbeet, 30 lettuce, plus spring onion & kale yet to go in
Still learning with intensive planting, a bit of trail & not much error it seems
Just started putting in the irrigation as well... shade cloth helps with the sun trying to cook the leaves, more shade cloth will go in as the greens get bigger


Experimenting with 6 dwarf tomato varieties for the first time, all heirloom with a growing height up to 1m, training them up the steel mesh = no stringing them up this time, just weave them thru the mesh... almost no maintenance
I trialled the weaving tomato thing last season with the mesh, made it so easy comparing to stringing things up. The toms could spread themselves wide along the mesh


First time growing 3 zucchini vines up a steel mesh, instead at ground level, taking over the garden

Plus, I didn't know that there were heirloom zucchini that is a bush type, these stay compacted in a 1m square footprint... a bit sceptical, as no one I know has heard of them, only time will tell eh
In the photo, 3 climber zucchini, 2 different bush type zucchini & 2 cucumbers... all heirloom
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote smudge Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Nov 2021 at 8:17pm
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++++ That's impressive Banana Boat.

I have about 12 tomato plants, black crim, beefsteak, chefs choice, black cherry & some old fashioned ugly thing that has fruit up to 900g with loads of flavour - kind of like a grosse leese on the pump. It was given to me by workmate/neighbour and he's grown them for years. My best tomato from that wouldn't be a quarter that size but i live in hope.

So far I have herbs - rosemary, tarragon, sage, parsley, mint, thyme & tarragon. Two types of spinach, IO dunno how many types of lettuce - maybe 6, yellow & green courgettes, crown pumpkins x 7, agria spuds, maybe 50 x sweetcorn all staggered planting dates, Lebanese cucumbers, radishes, raddachio (what do I do with those?), eggplants, capsicum, peas, climbing beans, three different lots of dwarf beans, rhubarb, spring onions, peaches times one million, grapes, passion fruit, 3 different plums, yellow red and pink guava, the worst apple ever and about 200 swan plants.

Crikey! No wonder it's 8.20pm and I haven't started dinner yet Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote smudge Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Nov 2021 at 8:37pm
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Oopps forgot the carrots, borage (good for bees in spring but what else?) & silverbeet - I grow heaps, maybe 60 or more - we eat some and use the rest to supplement the chooks & sheep feed.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Steps Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2021 at 9:18am
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I went to intensive gardening more by accident.. When move here very small garden space, and skim read an article on old french village gardens..
Rather than have lines, in squares.
And yeah increases production dramatically.
And lot less watering
And lot less maintenance.
I also noticed very quickly need to feed the garden far more and more often.

The herbs and things like fennel now reside in the shrub/ flower gardens.

Looks like rain tomorrow so hoping a few punnets and seeds at the local garden center...


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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2021 at 10:47am
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Originally posted by Clutch Clutch wrote:

I don't have a lot of garden But I see the Feijoa are flowering like crazy this year as are the passionfruit and grapefruit.

But my main concerns are for my 50ish Frangipani plants just coming out of dormancy right now.

Good luck. I love frangipanis and bought a couple in pots, and took them inside in winter etc. But about three years in, we lost them to some kind of rot in the stems. I think they got cold/wet feet and that was that.
I think if you can have them well drained and in a very warm, sunny spot against say a north-facing brick wall, they will go okay.

Here is our Poor Knights Lily - an amazing plant only found on those islands. They take years and years to flower, and like being root bound. we inherited ours from my wife's late mum, so cherish it.
It flowered for the first time about six years ago, and each year has had one or two more than the year before. They come in late Sept, Oct. But last year, zero flowers. We were gutted.
This year, a record 11 flowers. Not sure why the variation. Sometimes I mulch with some kelp from the beach, and i tried a kelp soup which was a recommendation I saw. Didn't seem to make a big difference.


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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote lingee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2021 at 1:41pm
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very nice ,they are like frangis they handle drying out but frangis like it moist in spring as in the islandsas they are about to flower around oct=nov,in winter frangis are happy with little of water as they are dormant or you get rot.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Jaapie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Nov 2021 at 10:07am
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Wow - those are amazing!

Never seen them before.
Sort of reminds you of a red aloe except the flowers grow horizontal.

Very cool @Tamure KidThumbs Up
"Only when the last tree has died, the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught,will we realize that we cannot eat money" - 19th Century Indian Creed
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Nov 2021 at 10:49am
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Originally posted by Jaapie Jaapie wrote:

Wow - those are amazing!

Never seen them before.
Sort of reminds you of a red aloe except the flowers grow horizontal.

Very cool @Tamure KidThumbs Up

Thanks Jaapie. The flowers are very striking.

We get a real thrill walking out to check the plant in late Sept to see what we might be blessed with in terms of flowers.

Below is a link to information about the plant. I find it fascinating from an evolution and geography point of view that they are only found naturally on the Poor Knights,  and on Hen Island (probably seed dropped by a bird). 

As it says, it's at least 10 years until you get flowers if you buy a small plant. Better to try to get an older plant. We bought two to supplement the one we got from my wife's mum. They are side by side in the same narrow bed, and they still haven't flowered yet, even though the leaves/fronds are about 3ft long.

https://www.tawapou.co.nz/about-native-plants/the-poor-knights-lily-xeronema-callistemon
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Sufishent Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Nov 2021 at 12:04pm
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Very nice. We have a pot outside our front door and we had 10 wonderful flowers this year:



Flowers are a little old now, so not as colorful
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote The Tamure Kid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Nov 2021 at 12:31pm
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Nice one Sufishent!! Very special.

Absolutely perfect living conditions for a healthy plan - root bound in a pot, and sunny for plenty of the day.

Our swamp flax (the big green one) is getting ready to flower, which is great for the local tui.
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