Landbased Fishing in Summer: Part 1

Landbased Fishing in Summer: Part 1

The first of their top 20 tips, Gene and Nicole Bryant of Strictly Land-based share ten things to consider when heading off on a landbased mission.

Summer’s here! If ever there is a time to hit the bricks, it’s now. Summer sessions are a must for all fishos but remember, preparation is key; so whether you’re chasing the elusive 20-pound snapper or an absolute horse of a kingie, make sure you’re organised so you can produce the goods!

Preparation is key

There’s honestly no better feeling than those spirit of the moment landbased sessions that you never thought you would be embarking on! The sun’s beaming, five knot variables are in your favour and the crew’s ready to go. However, you still have to make sure you’re prepared before stepping out the door. The following tips will see you stepping into a solid land-based session.

What to pack?

In this case less is not necessarily best but remember, the more weight you pack the more painful the walk in! Be reasonable with your kit; for example, if you know the spot you’re heading to is not prone to snags then obviously you won’t need as much tackle. You can never have enough room for excess berley and bait, but just save enough space for a selection of poppers and stickbaits because you never know when the kingies will arrive. Be sure to include:

  • Bait/berley
  • Hooks. We recommend Tasman Tackle 8/0 and 10/0 suicides. If you are wanting to keep it quick and simple Tasman Tackle also provide pre-made strayline and livebait rigs.
  • Leader. 40lb, 60lb and 150lb
  • – we always take 40lb in case the snapper are particularly line shy on that day!
  • Rods and reels. We recommend the Daiwa Saltist Hyper paired with the Daiwa Saltist Hyper Nero 5000 as this set up can be used to chase snapper or can have its drag loosened to livebait for kingies.
  • Berley bucket or sack.
  • VHF or phone in a drybag
  • A decent carry pack. Check out the Edge Fishing range.
  • Ice
  • Gaff/net
  • Knife/snips
  • First aid kit – cuts and scrapes are inevitable

Your gear is an investment

Give a man a fish, he eats for a day. Teach a man to fish and he has to buy rods, reels, neoprene waders, tackle packs, PFD’s, hooks, sinkers and stickbaits. It’s no secret the price of gear can often tally up to a deposit on a house, but investing in quality gear can make a huge difference as to whether you land the dream catch you have been chasing for twenty years or be snapped off before you even get a glimpse. Just remember to secure your gear well when it’s not in use and keep it maintained.

Stickbaiting is an effective - and exhilarating - way to catch kingfish off the rocks.

Stickbaiting is an effective - and exhilarating - way to catch kingfish off the rocks.

When and where to fish

With summer comes crowds. It’s to be expected that like-minded fishos will be getting their lines wet close by, so whether you’re walking in or kayaking out, try and push yourself a little further. You do not want to be fishing somewhere that was fished the day before. As the age-old saying goes, ‘never fish the same spot two days in a row.’ Those intending to spend the entire day on the bricks needn’t worry but if you’re wanting to target a specific species, we recommend early morning/late arvo (change of light) for snapper and middle of the day for kingfish.

A prime location for a landbased fishing adventure.

A prime location for a landbased fishing adventure.

It’s called fishing, not catching

There’s no money-back guarantee when it comes to fishing and unfortunately things don’t always go as planned. Just remember that although a pannie isn’t the moocher you dreamed of, it’s a meal nonetheless. If your intention is to target a specific species, however, then do just that! Try not to get side-tracked catching pannies in the berley trail (as entertaining as it may be) because you may miss your chance at catching that kingie you have been chasing all day.

Snapper will follow the berley trail right up into the shallows.

Snapper will follow the berley trail right up into the shallows.

Stock up on fresh baits

With some free time just around the corner, it’s worth digging out the old drag net and hitting your local estuaries and harbours. More often than not, you will end up with a variety of baits including mullet, yellowtail mackerel and piper.

Make a berley bucket

Making a berley bucket is well worth the 15 minutes it takes to put it together. Reduce waste by using your bucket again and again instead of spending money on a berley sack only for it to be used once. You will need an old, clean plastic paint bucket with lid, rope and a drill.

Using the drill, pierce holes all over the bucket. Drill two holes on the edge of the lid, opposite one another. You will need to drill a hole in the bucket that aligns with these. On one side tie a small piece of rope to seal the bucket and keep the lid on. (You will be glad to have this when your bucket is being smashed by swells.) On the other side tie a long piece of rope. We recommend a minimum of four metres. This allows you to tie your berley bucket on a secure rock/ledge when out fishing.

Using a rope to secure the berley is a must!

Using a rope to secure the berley is a must!

Invest in decent footwear and a PFD

A personal floatation device or life jacket, combined with decent footwear can make a huge difference between staying safe and dry, and ending up in the drink or worse. Every year hundreds of fishers end up in the water and not all of them make it home. The majority of us are aware of how unkind the ocean can be at times. Investing in quality shoes and PFD’s can make a huge impact on the outcome of your day. Personally, we recommend the Flexa DS Boots from Mares. Their 5mm sole and neoprene build means we stay warm, dry and comfortable. For PFD’s you can’t go past the best in the business. Anything from RFD or Crewsaver will have your head above water. For the more active fisho, check out the RFD Chinook. These vests allow you to move flexibly along the rocks, and they also work as a windbreak.

Spinning reel or overhead?

This comes down to personal preference. Both cast as far as one another and do the job they are built for. We recommend going to a tackle store and getting a feel for what works for you. Personally, we use the Daiwa Saltist Hyper Nero 5000 for chasing large snapper and kingies, as well as the Fin-nor BT-80 baitrunner. We love our baitrunners. These reels allow you more room to play as you can let the fish run and swallow the bait before striking – we live for those long slow runs!

Have you serviced your rod and reel?

Knocked the eye from your rod? Dropped your reel in the drink? Forgotten to rinse your gear? All the more reason to get your pride and joy into your local tackle store for a service, which will include a thorough internal clean. If you are not sure where to go, ask around – the majority of the people looking over your gear are avid fisherman and will treat your belongings like their own. There is nothing worse than hauling 20 kilos of bait, berley and tackle into your favourite fishing spot only for your reel to seize!

Follow the land-based adventures of Gene and Nicole on their Facebook page, Strictly Land-based.

   This article is reproduced with permission of   
New Zealand Fishing News

January 2020 - Gene and Nicole Bryant
Re-publishing elsewhere is prohibited

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