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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Alan L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Dec 2018 at 1:22pm
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Joined: 21 Nov 2012
Location: Hastings
Status: Offline
Points: 553
My S hook on the trailer let go once as I hauled along the beach. Got to car park to hook trailer on, no boat. Sitting in the sand about 50m back. Bumping over driftwood etc, the hook bent to 90+ degrees.
Don't forget to check yourselves as well as roller rods etc. For people who spend lots of time outdoors - especially on the water.
Never done one before - went for first skin check about 3 yrs ago and they found a nasty one straight off. Been back every year since and another found each time. Just happy to be on the water for another year instead of a hospital bed.
Alan
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Dec 2018 at 5:30pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
I can imagine the consequences but I'd rather not.

I had an interersting awareness for me anyway.

Brakes on a trailer, yes they are for larger boats or larger trailers in general.
Many have emergency brake away switches connected from the trailer to the vehicle.

So... when was the last time you checked yours...!!?
And I mean pull it and activate it.

Well they are made with poor quality steel unprotected to nature let alone salt mechanisms and construction components, hence they deteriorate rather fast.

I like most check many things, and I did, I'm an ass assume.

Yes it failed and yes I replaced it.
But ****, the consequences of not coming across that accidentally, gave me a pucker.
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Dec 2018 at 5:32pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Should of brought my water wings!

Having more sea in the boat than on the outside is always a concern.

Did you check your bilge pumps!?

I say bilge pumps or water extraction devices,
I use at least three, even in a small 5 metre boat.
Two are electric and one is manual.
The manual one I prefer to only have one hole in it, cos a bucket with two holes can be a challenge.

The electric pumps I have two, one very large and one small the smaller preferably for me with a flotation switch.

When I say check them the last you want to be doing is checking them when you need them, kinda of a redundant time.

Not only should they work in a power sense, but very often they clog, with fishing line and stones and shells and alsorts of crap that gets washed down to the well.
Consider at this time having them slightly elevated from the floor of the bilge, say by some small mesh structure. Lest crap vacuumed from the floor that way.

A common failure with pumps and even those that seem to cost a lot is again poor quality manufacture.
Often steel components and bearings, thanks manufacturer for making such a **** inferior product.

So checking may require disassembly and a lubricant sweetener.

Still when you flick that switch or grab that bucket it will be nice to know it actually works when you need it.
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Dec 2018 at 5:14pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Click.......click...........click.
Did ya check the health of those batteries before you left home and not at the ramp after you've launched the boat, are you one of those that stop everyone else from using the facilities while you figure out what's wrong while your fellow ramp users amp up there frustrations.

So do that check before hand, and if you haven't been testing every couple of months or charging them or running the engines, why not!?

Had you considered how old they are, did you do a load test. Have you removed those terminal connectors and cleaned the contact zones and lubricated those connections for re-assembly. Even a good battery will struggle if the connections are corroded.

And while your in there when was the last time you checked those big arse fuses, those 35 - 50 amp models. They generally run your engine or other high load equipment like your winches.
They do corrode in those waterproof cases... or did you lubricate them when you fitted them, the dealer or mechanic may not of.
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Dec 2018 at 6:08pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Lights!!!

Navigation, riding, cockpit, search, torch, headlamp.

If your operating in those hours that require them, either have them, fit them, use them or have them available.

I have come across a scenario that seems like deja vu on a perpetual motion toy.

Travelling at night, or morning before the sun cracks, or evening after the set.
These are regular times when I have come across absolute muppets (I'd like to use much stronger profanities) when out of the blue a kayak, a tinnie, or a launch exposes itself at a very uncomfortable time.
It's most common with small tinnies for me and I have been extremely lucky the worst have been in my open boat when I have been able to hear another boat is within the vicinity.
For those who operate this way.. I wish you a short shift to Davey jones locker, not by my hand and not really but that's the level of share hell you put me through when I have those closer than heart will allow.

But in general, check those things work. The big battery torch may help on that late afternoon fishing heaven that didn't want to finish and the text from her indoors still didn't stop that just one more bait mantra.
And the headlight on your head may be that tool that forewarns you to that slippery zone on the ramp.

Also consider those red lights for night, they keep your pupils more usable in that darker light.

And for the fisherman here, bright underwater lights actually work, the brighter the better and blue is the colour.

Whatever the need to light up, normally a kiwi fav, check that s-h- I-t.

Oh and when is someone going to invent a light source that will illuminate an area ahead larger than a pool table.

Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Dec 2018 at 5:32pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Swivels.

I'm going to enter the area of terminal tackle, I'll tread carefully cos opinions can be varied.
In saying that I'm only referring to my experience or preferences.

It's gotta be stainless, it has to be bearinged, it's gotta be strong, very strong, it needs to be as small as practical.
And for me I prefer Japanese terminal equipment as my go to.
The Japanese certainly produce some very minute swivels which have never let me down.

Good swivels cost good money.

If we consider that Gamefishing is an expensive pastime for most of us. And that the results can be in the main derived from countless hours of effort and cost surely when the magic happens the minutiae of component prep can become the break or make of an epic day, it's a reality.

Find a swivel and generally for us a swivel clip that is easy to use.

Don't forget to keep that swivel out of the water while trolling lures. It alone can be either a distraction to your quarry or a target for many smaller fish.
If it is a target then the associated space from line to leader around this zone could be chaffed.
So regular checking of your gear within this zone could be a bonus.
Unless you like losing fish after a protracted battle.
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Alan L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Dec 2018 at 8:34pm
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Gold


Joined: 21 Nov 2012
Location: Hastings
Status: Offline
Points: 553
Interesting point - about keeping the swivel out of the water. On the riggers and short corner, I can get that, but how about the rest?
Was on a charter boat a week or so ago - and he was trolling twice as far back as I do. All the swivels had to be in the water. But I have pondered the same thing you mention. I am happy when I see them out of the water. But can't keep them all out.
Regards
Alan
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote Tagit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Dec 2018 at 9:36pm
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Moderator - Black Belt
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Joined: 21 Aug 2003
Location: Westhaven, Auck
Status: Online
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The most productive or 2nd most productive position on Tagit is the shotgun. It is run 'way' back and I am sure the swivel is in the water. Whilst I would try to keep them out, I am more concerned about seeing the lure running in the right position than where the swivel is. 

Interesting thing about running the lures back further. A few seasons back we were only getting bites on the back lures which was a bit unusual. So we dropped all the lures back one wave and that brought the sorter lures into play again. So instead of waves 2 - 5 + shotgun it was waves 3 to 6 + shotgun. Can't tell you why it worked that day, but it did. Certainly would hesitate to drop everything back a wave to see if it works better
www.dreamboats.com        Bareboat Charters - Fishing Charters - Corporate and Party Cruises
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Alan L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Dec 2018 at 6:27am
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Joined: 21 Nov 2012
Location: Hastings
Status: Offline
Points: 553
Same for my boat - shotgun - 80% of hits. Swivel has to be in the water. But I have observed the trolling swivels, and wondered. They do look like small baitfish, and the last thing you want is those being smashed.
I run my shotgun at the end of the bubble trail - just sitting in the 'clearing' water. Not further back in absolutely clear water - just where it is almost clear. Now you see it/now you don't. Better strike now before it disappears in the bubble trail.
Alan
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Dec 2018 at 5:49pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Rubber bands.

Not ya red bands ya sheep peeper.

There are a multitude of uses for rubber bands, we commonly seem to use size 32 and 64.
They tie on a myriad of things, they are used as breakaways, to tidy up kit in your bag.
And after the summer or part way through you have rubber gum everywhere.
The brown office or general purpose rubber bands we use are quite simply crap.

Do your self a favour and buy black high quality crepe rubber bands.

Unfortunately no nz retailer is prepared to spend some pennies and bring them in. So you'll have to import them in yourself. Buy in bulk it can help the price. But you'll never have sticky then dry hard bands on or around your gear again.
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2018 at 5:20pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Rods.

No longer those hard pieces of wood or the modern super strong fibreglass.
We are now blessed with some amazingly constructed tools of a myriad of materials that provide us with specific bend, length, weight, two pieces, grips and of course price.

Are you checking it each season.
Some of the basics are your rod guides or rollers.
Check your guide rings for a fracture crack, not uncommon, when we accidentally drop these in the heat of the moment or just transhipping.
These cracks can tear shreds out of your line wether braid or mono.
If you have rollers, do they rotate, better still disassemble and reassemble for surety of mind. And recheck they rotate.
Check the guides whipping for fractures in the resin which maybe a forerunner of a binding degradation.

Is your rod two piece, when did you last take it apart, time to do so and lubricate its reassembly.

Have you taken the reel off to check the seat. Tape up the seat and foot of the reel and lubricate generously. Don't forget the tensioner rings.
Are you using a clip point on the clamp that is attached to a rope or lanyard tied to the boat while your trolling, why not.

If you want to protect your straight or bent butt base have you taped it up so it can't rub the metals or composite components while in the rod holders.

When was the last time you checked the butt seat. Those locators aren't always a fixed item they can often be a screwed in item, are they loose, that's a bugger.

Some roller tips in particular are not as suitable as you may think for braid.
Earlier versions had large gaps as they were agricultural by design, accomodating only Dacron or mono by comparison to today's materials. There can be a gap that the braid can slip into, it's curtains from there I'm afraid.

Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote shaneg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2018 at 8:18pm
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Platinum
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Joined: 12 Jul 2009
Location: New Zealand
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Points: 2039
Rods,you are right Mattoo critical piece of kit. Very important to check guides .. found some salt specs on some of mine today even though we're washed end of last season. Check rollers especially tips and stripping guides. Bit of light oil and twine will sometimes help get going and avoid disassembly.
Exit mould or equivalent Selleys product which is very good! No good showing up to a big comp with green mouldy boat and truck ( like I might of last year hoping salty air will take it way). Got this tip from panel beater on Saturday who remedialed my rusty tow bar. "Your truck will look better after trip to supermarket and some exit mould". Did boat as well while I was at it. Both now look amazing. Funny how mould tends to go on one side of things that are parked up. Need to look your best!

Pretty sure mould is marlin turn off as well, although bottom of one very successful tuts boat I know looks as though could well do with a clean.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Dec 2018 at 5:25pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Groin protectors, nut savers, thigh and stomach bruising avoidance tools.

If your a stand up fisherman fighting a large pelagic and not fuelled on adrenaline of your first time or showing ya mates your as tough as cheese you could do with one of these.

Get a good one, get a variety.
I personally use the black magic xxxxlll, well no just an xl.
They do save your back, groin, energy and arms.
So get the back brace model.

Check those webbing attachments like the clips, the plastic adjusters, remember all those plastic components will suffer from uv damage, faster than you might realise.
Are those clips to the reel operating, grease them or replace them.

Is your kit fitted to you or the guy that is on the rod.
Arse crack is only a storage place for a knife.

Does your setup include a knife or quick release cutter in case you get in trouble on board or worst case in the water.
Cos ya can get pulled over, and if your solo it's standard kit.
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Hodder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2018 at 8:15am
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Bronze
Bronze


Joined: 13 Dec 2014
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Points: 97
And most importantly never forget the salt ice and chilli bin to keep those beers cold, crew morale is of the upmost importantance when spending a long day on the water..
Always check for broken latches on the chillibin and make sure the bin is clean before adding the ice. Store in suitable position on the boat if weather is lumpy store it well aft and secure.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2018 at 5:35pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Looking after your catch.

If you intend consuming your catch there are some tools and techniques that may keep you ready for any situation.

Hodder, you read my mind.

Salt ice is the go to for all fish. Do not use fresh water ice.
Ice is the principle tool to chill your catch as quickly as possible. And the ice slurry with salt water is the best technique.
Never leave your catch overnight in a slurry. It's purely a fast chilling technique. When it's chilled store your catch in a dry cold environment.

And if your catch is so humungeos it can't fit in the chilly even if your drain all the bottles first, there are still options.
A chilly bag is easy to store and comes in some great sizes. Just add ice?

The good old sugar sack made of hessian is a great tool. A few of these laid over the fish and very regularly wetted down with salt water is a great stand by.

Those big two litre drink bottles, hell any plastic bottle frozen down is a great tool.

If you land a large pelagic remember to keep it on board in an upright position as best you can.
You may ask why, it's because if it's laid on a side, that side on the deck will become soft and squishy, essentially bruised by the sheer weight. If you like your food in its best condition consider this. Oh it's not easy to do by the way.

Remember the chilly has a multiple array of uses, it's a game chair, table, seat, stores your drinks, your food and on a successful day your catch, and an offset of weight used to balance smaller boats.

Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (1) Likes(1)   Quote the demon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2018 at 10:09pm
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Joined: 11 Aug 2004
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Points: 1429
Lunch Box?
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote jakepitsville Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2018 at 10:01am
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Joined: 29 Apr 2008
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Just finished making wind ons - 3 foot 250lb MoiMoi into 200lb hollow braid using the hollow ace method of using braid to whip the braid some super glue (zap) to finish.  Lures are almost ready - traces all done spread bars and dredge all done.  Just have to add hooks which still require shrink wrap.  Looking at heading out Saturaday!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote Merci Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2018 at 11:45am
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Silver
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Joined: 25 Jul 2006
Location: West Auckland
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Points: 287
Originally posted by MATTOO MATTOO wrote:

Looking after your catch.

If you land a large pelagic remember to keep it on board in an upright position as best you can.
You may ask why, it's because if it's laid on a side, that side on the deck will become soft and squishy, essentially bruised by the sheer weight. If you like your food in its best condition consider this. Oh it's not easy to do by the way.


We always keep a couple of those roll up camping mats on board to put under the fish. Snow, a old fish smoker in Whiti taught us that. Makes a huge difference to the meat apparently.
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2018 at 5:43pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Riggers.

I'll start with the principle first of yet another wide and varied and controversial tool.

The charters use them, must be a reason.

They are intended as a tool to deploy and locate a teaser yes a teaser in the water column behind a vessel to imitate the actions of a fish/squid in distress, hunting, or alone.

Remember the boat is the main teasing tool.

The outrigger as above serves to place various actioned lures in the set of waves behind the boat in either clear or aerated water.

Also note that different vessels have different wake and disturbed aeration of the water.
Launches have cleaner water with shorter aerated water streams where as outboards have more disturbed aerated water for a longer trail.

With riggers we are trying to achieve width and height.
Width to place in cleaner water as well as keeping the spread apart. Height to impart different actions developed by the lures dependant on there design, as well as distance behind the vessel without dragging the line in the water.

Riggers come in length and strength or stiffness.
The length gives us as above width and height. Stiffness gives us a concise tool to control the impact of strike wether hard or soft dependent on the lure and fishing style of the skipper and crew.

Mounting of your riggers on a launch gives more options generally for height and width.
And storage during travel is relatively clean and straight forward.

Trailer boats look for a compromise of height, ease of set, ease of storage and then storage for on road transport.

Whatever your rigger set up keep in mind all kiss options behind the mounting, deployment, storage and halyard user control over your lines.
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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Post Options Post Options   Likes (0) Likes(0)   Quote MATTOO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Dec 2018 at 5:30pm
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Titanium
Titanium


Joined: 10 Sep 2010
Location: The Dawn
Status: Offline
Points: 4401
Fish TV.

Is it still working.
Do you remember how to use it all.
Do you need to reread the instructions.
Have you got rid of the crap marks.
Are all your genuine marks building that picture of hunting zones.
Have you got the new marks of interest installed.
Are you getting the best picture that the demo mode showed you.
Do you get electrical interference.
Do you get aeration issues.
Basically is your transducer mounted that you can get a clear picture at all speeds.
Have you checked the mounting internal or external for corrosion or leakage.
Is the cable abrasion free.

Does yours tell you where the fish actually are?
Just cruising in a pimped old Surtees! Or my now sweetas pimped out Southern 755 HT0!
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